St. John's University

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University Overview

St. John's University has been serving the twin communities of Fallcoast and Hanging Hills for almost two hundred years. Established by the Roman Catholic Church, it remains partially owned by them but is open to students of all faiths. It remains an accredited university, taking in hundreds of students from over New England, the United States and the world.

It is a relatively wealthy school, and maintains its standing through donations from the local families as well as its owners, and increased tuition rates for graduate students pursuing more esoteric studies. St.John's University has a history of being open towards studies in the occult and theology, complex mathematics and quantum physics. It also boasts very well-regarded history and English departments, along with graduate studies for both schools.

Schools of Law and Medicine have been established on campus and the clinic on the grounds is predominately staffed by last year interns.

Established: 1822

School colors: Black, White and Silver.

School mascot: The Sharks

Location: University City (B03)

Head of the College: Dean Martin

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Schedule

Fall Semester - 2017

August 28 Fall semester classes begin
September 10 Last day to drop classes
October 9-11 Fall Break
November 22-27 Thanksgiving Break
December 8 Last day of Fall classes
December 11-15 Fall semester examinations


Curriculum

If you're a student, why not sign up for classes under the relevant class. Classes marked with an * are compulsory to obtain a Major in that subject. Classes that start with a '3' or more are only available to those doing a Major in that subject. Each class is expected to run a semester but you can do more than one per semester.
The course presented are for obtaining a Major in that degree. If you wish to do Honors or further study then additional units may need to be created.


Accounting

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least one Level 3.

ACC 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting* (6) - This unit provides students with an introduction to financial accounting guided by the Conceptual Framework and Accounting Standards. Emphasis is placed on accounting processes, practices and policies that enable financial statements to be prepared. Students will integrate theoretical and technical knowledge learned and exercise judgment to explore accounting issues. Course Instructor:

ACC 102 - Introduction to Management Accounting* (6)- This introductory management accounting unit focuses on the types of cost information that can be produced to assist managers and other employees within organizations in planning and control, and in decision-making. Topics include: costs and cost behavior, product costing, cost allocation techniques, cost-volume-profit analysis, and the use of cost information for management decisions. Course Instructor:

ACC 103 - Financial Accounting* (6) - This unit examines financial accounting issues associated with the operation of corporate structures. Topics include financial reporting requirements, financing company operations, business combinations, the nature of corporate groups, the preparation of consolidated financial statements and financial statement analysis. Course Instructor:

ACC104 - Management Accounting* (6) - This unit focuses on the provision and use of management accounting information for management planning and control in organizations. Technical and behavioral issues related to budgeting, variance analysis, performance measurement, and value chain management are considered. Course Instructor:

ACC201 - Advanced Financial Accounting (6) - This unit explores advanced financial accounting issues, building on knowledge and skills gained in earlier units in financial accounting. A range of theories used to assess accounting decisions, reporting practices and regulation are examined. The unit focuses on a number of contemporary accounting issues including: measurement, intangible assets, financial instruments, foreign currency transactions and integrated reporting. Course Instructor:

ACC202 - Accounting Information Systems (6) - At the core of Accounting Information Systems is the idea that accountants must understand the core business processes that underpin the business activities in an organization and generate transaction data. Thus, the objective of this unit is to provide students with a broad introduction to the core business processes. Course Instructor:

ACC203 - Auditing and Assurance (6) - This unit encompasses the nature and purpose of audit and assurance services, and the regulatory and professional environment in which they operate. Students apply professional, ethical and legal requirements stemming from the assurance framework and applicable auditing pronouncements to 'real world' scenarios. Course Instructor:

ACC204 - Accounting for Sustainability (6) - This unit focuses on the ways in which sustainability impacts on the core functions performed by professionals in accounting and business. It considers both external and internal reporting aspects of corporate social and environmental sustainability, and the ways in which such information can be incorporated into decisions made within the entity. The implications of such information for the assurance function are also explored. Course Instructor:

ACC205 - Financial Analysis and Valuation (6) - This unit explores a range of techniques used to analyze corporate financial performance and valuation of entities. These include: application and use of financial ratios and forecasting techniques, accounting-based and cash flow-based share valuation, credit analysis and financial distress prediction, equity security analysis, and analysis relating to mergers and takeovers. Course Instructor:

ACC301 - Advanced Management Accounting (6) - The unit aims to provide an advanced understanding of how management accounting supports organizational strategy. It extends prior management accounting knowledge, provides overarching frameworks for understanding performance management and covers topics relating to a variety of organizational settings. Course Instructor:

ACC302 - International Study Program in Accounting (6) - This unit centers on both a conceptual and practical approach to international accounting issues with emphasis on international standard setting and compliance as viewed by regulatory and private sector preparers of accounts. Students gain a practical understanding of these issues in an international context through the overseas visitation program which forms an integral part of this unit. Course Instructor:

ACC303 - Industry Based Learning Project (6) - This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to put theory into practice in a business environment. Course Instructor:

ACC304 - Corporate Finance (6) - The aim of this unit is to introduce students to the theory and application of why and how value enhancing corporate financial decisions are made and implemented. With the emphasis on publicly listed companies, topics covered include; the corporate objective of management; investment evaluation models; valuation of equity and debt instruments; sources and types of funding; issues in risk and return; portfolio theory; asset pricing models; issues in capital structure and dividend policy; and the efficiency of capital markets. The unit is designed to ensure students gain the necessary skill set for making value-changing financial decisions to maximize firm value. Course Instructor:

ACC305 - Taxation Law (6) Assessable income and exempt income; deductions; capital gains tax; fringe benefits tax; goods and services tax; residence and source; individual offsets. Course Instructor:

ACC306 - Corporations Law (6) Topics include the separate legal entity status of companies and the concept of limited liability; the effect of registration; the corporate constitution; the company's relationship with outsiders; corporate management incorporating extensive consideration of directors' duties; share capital; regulation of public fund raising; members' remedies incorporating statutory remedies and common law rights of action; members' meetings; forms of corporate insolvency administrations. Course Instructor:

ACC307 - Insolvency (6) - This unit provides students with an understanding of the general law of insolvency. The focus is on both personal insolvency through the bankruptcy process and corporate insolvency through liquidations, administrations and receiverships. The unit examines the role of insolvency administrators, the structure of such administrations, the effect on insolvents and the effect on creditors. There is also some discussion of the regulation of insolvency administrators. Course Instructor:



Anthropology

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least 18 points in Level 3.

Students: Sarah

ANTH 101 - Magic, Science and Spirituality* (6) - This unit enables students to gain understanding of what magic, ritual and spiritual beliefs means to people in the modern world. It also introduces first year students to some of the contributions that anthropologists and sociologists of magic and religion have made to knowledge of human societies. Course Instructor:

ANTH 102 - Culture in Anthropology* (6) – an introduction to theories of 'culture' in anthropology, including a survey of historical ideas (such as a fixed evolutionary scale of cultures) and contemporary theories of how 'culture' might be defined and used as an analytical tool. Course Instructor:

ANTH 103 - The Anthropology of International Development* (6) - This unit takes an anthropological approach to critiquing international aid and development and the global structures it is embedded within. It examines the ways anthropologists theorize social and economic patterns of change; how development policy is imagined, produced, received or resisted across multiple cultural contexts; and how development and those being developed are imagined and defined through specific case studies of approaches, institutions and practitioners in the field. Course Instructor:

ANTH 104 - Borders, Displacement and Belonging* (6) - Mobile Worlds explores socially and culturally diverse forms of migrant experience, from among those known as gypsies, nomads, vagabonds, slaves, tourists, illegal aliens, refugees, asylum seekers and other displaced peoples, settlers, formal, informal and illegal migrants, guest workers, labor and love migrants, 'gold collar' workers, international students, circular migrants, diasporas, transnational and transilient communities around the globe. Course Instructor:

ANTH 201 - Anthropology of Human Rights (6) - This unit will explore the debates within anthropology over human rights. It will explore the notion of structural violence and anthropological human rights activism with ethnographic examples from a range of settings and marginalized populations. In doing so, this unit will introduce students to key concepts and debates in the anthropology of human rights and provide fresh, rich understandings of the operation of power. Course Instructor:

ANTH 202 - Indigenous Peoples Globally (6) - This unit introduces students to basic issues connected with indigeneity such as the first peoples concept; historical engagements with colonial or settler populations; the importance of distinctiveness to indigenous identities; and the importance and vulnerability of heritage in indigenous groups. Course Instructor:

ANTH 203 - Ceremonial and Ritual (6) – an examination of the roles played by ceremonies and rites in forming communal bonds, and in creating elites by exclusionary practices. Elements of commonality and specific difference around the world are highlighted. Course Instructor:

ANTH 204 - Colonisation and Acculturation (6) – an opportunity to study the impact of settlement in the 'New World' upon both colonists and natives, with particular attention paid to changing conceptions of the nature of settler and native communities, their purposes, and the role of 'the other' in defining their place in the world. Course Instructor:

ANTH 205 - Social Research Methods (6) - Doing social science research requires us to think conceptually, to systematically plan how we might obtain valid information relevant to the research questions we are asking, and to analyze information. Because social science research draws on people's experiences, its conduct inevitably raises ethical and political questions. In this unit, we will discuss these issues. Course Instructor:

ANTH 206 - Religion and Spirituality in a Globalizing World (6) - The unit explores new forms of religiosity that are shaping the way many people respond to today's globalizing world. Major trends include the rise of fundamentalist streams in the world religions, the proliferation of revitalization movements supporting local religious traditions, and the emergence of post-modern forms of religion such as New Age and eco-spirituality. These value-focused belief systems reinterpret the meaning of contemporary life experience, but they are also concerned about global crises and injustices and propose utopian alternatives to the prevalent ethos of materialism and greed. Course Instructor:

ANTH 208 - Heritage, Culture and Land vs Law (6) - When Europeans arrived in America they brought with them a complex system of laws which were markedly different to those used and practiced by Indigenous Americans for thousands of years. The subsequent imposition of European law over Indigenous law created significant tensions especially in relation to Indigenous connections to land, sea and culture. This unit undertakes an interdisciplinary study related to Indigenous Law, land rights, Native Title, Indigenous knowledge and cultural heritage. Course Instructor:

ANTH 301 - Japanese Culture and Society (3) - Culture of the Japanese: traditional and modern, rural and urban, cultural and social institutions; village and urban organization; and family structure. Aspects of social change in contemporary rural and urban Japan. Course Instructor:

ANTH 302 - Chinese Culture and Society 3) - Culture of the Chinese: traditional and modern, rural and urban, cultural and social institutions; village and urban organization; and family structure. Aspects of social change in contemporary rural and urban China. Course Instructor:

ANTH 303 - Mexican Culture and Society 3) - Culture of the Mexican: traditional and modern, rural and urban, cultural and social institutions; village and urban organization; and family structure. Aspects of social change in contemporary rural and urban Mexico. Course Instructor:

ANTH 304 - Health, Culture and Society (6) - The unit examines the sociological aspects of health. Seminar topics include: media representations of health and illness; public campaigns on smoking, alcohol and obesity; the turn to popular culture in health communications, including the CDC's popular 'zombie preparedness' campaign; responses to 21st century pandemics, including swine flu, SARS and Avian flu; the social and psychological impact of new biotechnologies to prevent and treat diseases, and; reproductive and sexual health. Course Instructor:

ANTH305 - Managing Intercultural Communication (6) - This unit examines basic concepts of intercultural communication: face and politeness in language; the relation between cultural values and discourse; cultural variation in speech acts, turn taking rules and formulaic patterns; cultural differences in the organization of written and spoken discourse; and examines their interaction in intercultural communication in the global context. Course Instructor:

ANTH306 - Sustainable Development in Latin America (6) - The challenge of sustainable development is unprecedented. Extreme poverty, inequality and social exclusion is widening within most countries and the rapid decline of our planet's health threatens the ecosystems upon which life depends. To drive an action agenda for addressing these challenges, organizations such as the United Nations have begun linking poverty reduction and inequality within the broader context of sustainability. Course Instructor:

ANTH 307 - Field Methods in Anthropology and International Development (12) - The unit involves an international field trip to St. John's Amazon and provides students with formal and applied training in qualitative and ethnographic field research methods. The unit consists of a two week (16 day) stay in Brazil. This includes a field site visit, in which students will work with the local unit coordinator and the Amazon Basin Community Observatory (ABCO) to conduct small-scale research projects, gather data in the field, analyze, and present their findings. Course Instructor:



Archaeology

Degree requires completion of at least 36 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 2 and 3.

ARCH 101 - Intro to Archaeology* (6) - This course includes the fundamental principles of archaeology, pre-history, and a basic understanding of dig site procedure. - Course Instructor: Arthur Abernathy

ARCH 102 - Basic Field Studies* (6) - This course takes the principles learned and applies them to a limited field trip exercise. Course Instructor: Arthur Abernathy

ARCH 103 - World Civilizations to 1500CE (6) - This course examines the rise and fall of civilizations from the Neolithic period to the start of the European Renaissance, focusing on cultural change, political and religious beliefs, and, in particular, social structures. Students will gain historical knowledge across a broad period, and will acquire analytical and research skills. Course Instructor:

ARCH 201 - World History Since 1500CE (6) - This course examines the rise and fall of civilizations from the European Renaissance to the modern day, focusing on cultural change, political and religious beliefs, and, in particular, social structures. Students will gain historical knowledge across a broad period, and will acquire analytical and research skills. Course Instructor: Arthur Abernathy

ARCH 202 - Archaeology of Native Americans (6) - This course will address the major issues and examine the archaeological evidence relating to American "prehistoric" archaeology, including initial colonization of the continent, environmental history, the pattern of Pleistocene adaptations and late Holocene Change. Course Instructor:

ARCH 203 - Indigenous Perspectives (6) - The course is built around themes with a central core based around the presentation of knowledge and experiences through Indigenous American perspectives and viewpoints. Course Instructor:

ARCH 204 - History of Western Ideas (6) - This course provides a survey of some of the most significant currents of ideas in Western culture. Course Instructor:

ARCH 205 - Ethical Issues and Human Rights (6) - This course introduces students to the main legal, ethical, and social justice responsibilities that are integral to professional and research contexts. Course Instructor: Aaron

ARCH 206 - Communication and Scholarship (6) - This course presents an introduction to the theory and practice of communication, with particular application to academic and professional settings. Students study the processes of research and scholarship, and of tailoring communication for specific audiences. Course Instructor:

ARCH 301 - Major Field Study (12) - Students will spend six months working on site at a dig in a yet to be determined location. Course Instructor: Arthur Abernathy

Architecture

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least one Level 3.

ARC 101 - Architecture and Interior Architecture Studio* (6) - The City as Cultural Artefact. Course Instructor:

ARC 102 - Technology of Design* (6) - Introduction to the theoretical and pragmatic relationships - the why and the how - between the built environment, natural environment and human environment in design. Course Instructor:

ARC 103 - Understanding Architecture* (6) - This unit is an introduction to selected architectural themes and concepts. Course Instructor:

ARC 104 - Architectural Habitation* (6) - Exploring the importance of visualization in ideation and conceptual design . Course Instructor:

ARC 201 - Architecture and Spatial Grammar (6) - Students will undertake lessons in spatial grammar and local mannerism. Course Instructor:

ARC 202 - Architectural Technology in Context (6) - Environmental design of small scale buildings in the local context. Course Instructor:

ARC 203 - Architectural Histories of Illusion, Power and Imagination (6) - Introduction to the major historical periods of architecture from the Ancient world up to the Twentieth century. Course Instructor:

ARC 204 - Architectural Context (6) - Students will undertake studies in the physical and social context of building and building groups. Course Instructor:

ARC 205 - Architecture and Identity (6) - Addresses cultural and historical themes in regional design precedents. Course Instructor:

ARC 206 - Architectural Discourse (6) - Investigate various theoretical positions that directly result in differing ways of thinking about and making architecture. Course Instructor:

ARC 301 - Urban Contexts(6) - An examination of cities and townscapes in their chronological and historical contexts. Course Instructor:

ARC 302 - Environmental and Technological Systems in Architecture (6) - Construction and environmental and technological systems for medium scale, clear span architectural projects and methods of architectural communication. Course Instructor:

ARC 303 - Architectural Design and Technical Integration (6) - Studies into the design and development of buildings of medium rise, complexity and scale. Course Instructor:

ARC 304 - Architecture, Theory and Critique (6) - Introduction to various post-modern and post-structuralist movements and critiques on architecture. Course Instructor:

ARC 305 - Practical Application (6) - Students will submit architectural designs to a committee for possible Fallcoast construction. Course Instructor:

Students: Summer Cavanaugh



Astrophysics

Degree requires completion of at least 42 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least one Level 3.

AST 101 - Discrete Mathematics* (6) - This unit provides a background in the area of discrete mathematics to provide an adequate foundation for further study in computer science. Course Instructor:

AST 102 - Quantitative Methods for Science* (6) - This unit provides an introduction to the basic quantitative methods and techniques common to much of Science. Course Instructor:

AST 103 - Mathematics I* (6) - This is the first mainstream university mathematics unit; it is essential for students in engineering and many areas of science. Course Instructor:

AST 104 - Statistical Data Analysis* (6) - The unit provides an introduction to modern statistical principles and practice with special emphasis on data analytical techniques. Course Instructor:

AST 201 - Mathematics II (6) - The ideas related to systems of linear equations introduced in AST103 are further developed to study ideas related to linearity, including determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformations and vector spaces. Course Instructor:

AST 202 - Electric and Magnetic Interactions (6) - This unit provides an overview of physics both for students primarily intending to study physics, astronomy or photonics beyond first year, and for engineering students who wish to explore physics at a greater depth. Course Instructor:

AST 203 - Modern Mechanics (6) - This unit, together with PHYS106, provides an overview of physics both for students primarily intending to study physics, astronomy or photonics beyond first year, and for engineering students who wish to explore physics at a greater depth. Course Instructor:

AST 204 - Physics I (6) - This unit, together with PHYS143, gives an overview of physics, which aims to discover and understand the fundamental laws of nature and use them to explain the phenomena that occur in the universe. Course Instructor:

AST 205 - Classical and Quantum Oscillations and Waves (6) -This unit is concerned with describing the properties of harmonic oscillations and wave motion. Course Instructor:

AST 206 - Electromagnetism and Thermodynamics (6) - The theory of electromagnetism, one of the most successful and most widely applied theories of modern physics, describes the properties and behaviour of electric and magnetic fields and their interaction with charged matter. Course Instructor:

AST 301 - Advanced Astronomy (6) - This unit is designed to give students an appropriate background and theoretical understanding of astronomical observations and selected topics in galaxy and stellar evolution. Course Instructor:

AST 302 - Astrophysics (6) - This unit covers the physical mechanisms responsible for the generation, absorption and scattering of light in environments as diverse as rarefied nebulae, hot compact stellar atmospheres and distant galaxies. Course Instructor:

AST 303 - General Relativity (6) - This unit presents Einstein's theory of general relativity. Course Instructor:

AST 304 - Classical Electrodynamics (6) - this unit deals with the classical theory of electromagnetism, which is the first successful unified theory in physics. Course Instructor:

AST 305 - Frontiers of Astronomy and Astrophysics - Practical Application (8) - Students will develop familiarity with the required tools to tackle a real-world astrophysics problem and conduct their research project. Course Instructor:



Business

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least 18 points in Level 3/4.

BUS 101 - Introduction to Management* (6) - On completion of this unit students should have an understanding of: the nature of managerial work in organizations; theories of management and their historical development; contemporary issues and practices relating to managing people and organization's; key factors in the organization's environment that impact on how managers and the organizations work. Course Instructor:

BUS 102 - Managerial Communication* (6) - Communication theory emphasizing written and oral communication in relation to organizational, intrapersonal, interpersonal and group communication. Importance of relationships in the work context, language, listening and nonverbal behavior. Interpersonal contexts include negotiation, interviewing, feedback, coaching and counselling. Group communication -- roles, leadership and facilitation, problem-solving, decision making and group creativity. Course Instructor:

BUS 103 - Organizational Behavior and Change* (6) - The unit takes a positive and appreciative approach, presenting supportable practices and interventions to help understand and develop more positive and productive individual, team and organizational behaviors and outcomes. Course Instructor:

BUS 104 - Business Strategy* (6)- Business Strategy enhances students' knowledge of the process of strategy formulation, implementation and evaluation within a business, and the key contextual factors and managerial decisions which influence this process. Course Instructor:

BUS 201 - Managing Employee Relations (6) - Management of employment relationships and workplace issues is central to the unit. Roles of parties to the employment relationship -- management, employees, trade unions, employer groups, governments, and tribunals -- are analyzed. Management and employee roles in conflict resolution, negotiation and bargaining, conciliation and arbitration, and maintaining control of the employment relationship are covered. Course Instructor:

BUS 202 - International Business (6) - The international environment including international trade and investment, and the legal, political, cultural and technological contexts faced by internationalizing organizations; forms of operations available to the internationalizing organization; the impact of the multinational enterprise; international strategic planning. Course Instructor:

BUS 203 - Managing Quality, Innovation and Knowledge (6) - The unit covers quality management theory, quality control systems, continuous improvement, product and process innovation, the management of knowledge for innovation, teamwork systems and organizational restructuring for innovation and quality management. Course Instructor:

BUS 204 - Managing Conflict (6) - Participants in this unit will study a variety of theories and processes that will enhance their skills in avoiding and resolving disputes within and between organizations. Course Instructor:

BUS 205 - Human Resource Management (6) - This unit is an introduction to human resource management, theory, context and practices. It focuses on the contribution of HRM to organizational competitive advantage and meeting the needs of employees and other stakeholders. Course Instructor:

BUS 206 - Operations Management (6) - Unit covers the major activities within the operations function of businesses, both manufacturing and service. Course Instructor:

BUS 207 - Management Ethics and Corporate Governance (6) - This unit examines the theoretical foundations of the different answers that have been given to these two fundamental questions. More specifically it examines the topics of ethical issues in marketing and advertising, climate change and environmental protection regulation and corporate governance, human resource management and social accounting. Course Instructor:

BUS 301 - HRM and Managing Global Workforces (6) - This unit explores the HRM theory and practice of managing workforces globally. Topics may include workforce planning in a global context, design of work processes and systems, and risk management in a dynamic environment. Course Instructor:

BUS 302 - Events and Tourism (6) - This unit considers festivals and events as important and growing sectors of the tourism industry. Course Instructor:

BUS 303 - Leadership Principles and Practices (6) - This interactive unit examines principles and practices of leadership which are vital for aspiring leaders of the future. Through a personal portfolio of leadership concepts, character, and competencies, students develop their potential for growth as strategic leaders of the 21st century organizations. Course Instructor:

BUS 304 - Accounting Information Systems and Financial Modelling (6) - The objective of this unit is two-fold. First, the unit provides students with a broad introduction to accounting information systems and the role technology plays in accounting. The focus will be on an introduction to: enterprise systems; database management; documentation methods; internal controls; and the core business processes found in organizations. Second, the unit focuses on corporate modelling theory; models as decision support tools; types and uses of models; benefits and limitations of models; effective spreadsheet design; auditing spreadsheet models and development of various models using an industry standard spreadsheet. Course Instructor:

BUS 305 - Data Mining and Modelling for Business (6) - Introduction to principles and techniques for modelling business and economic data. It also aims to provide an understanding and application of the tools and techniques of data mining in delivering superior value added propositions to businesses. Course Instructor:

BUS401 - Principles of Forecasting and Applications (6) - In this unit, students will be introduced to methods suitable for forecasting in these circumstances. These methods include classical decomposition of time series, exponential smoothing, Box-Jenkins ARIMA modelling and regression with auto-correlated disturbances. Students will also be exposed to several case studies, to study the application of these methods in real-life situations. Course Instructor:

BUS402 - Accounting for Managers (6) - This unit introduces basic accounting concepts to non-accountants. Course Instructor:

BUS403 - Corporate Finance (6) - The aim of this unit is to teach students to the theory and application of why and how value enhancing corporate financial decisions are made and implemented. Course Instructor:

BUS404 - Marketing Theory and Practice (6) - Marketing activities undertaken by a wide range of organizations (business, government, profit, non profit); examines marketing theory, the marketing concept and its evolution from a strategic and applied perspective. Course Instructor:

BUS405 - Consumer Psychology (6) - This unit draws upon the concepts and theories developed in the social sciences to provide students with an introduction to the complex area of consumer psychology and decision-making. Course Instructor:

BUS406 - Applied Econometrics (6) - This unit presents econometric models and techniques that are widely used in applied econometrics. The topics covered are linear regression models with random regressors, method of moments and instrumental variables estimation; simultaneous equations models; models for time-series data; introduction to maximum likelihood estimation; models for discrete dependent variables and models for panel data. Course Instructor:



Computer Sciences

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least 18 points in Level 2/3.

CS101 - Programming foundations* (6) - This unit will provide students with an overview of the fundamental knowledge and skills required to code applications. The topics covered will include: the context of programming in an industrial SDLC, dealing with code 'plumbing', data, using API library classes, common business logic patterns and their implementation using control structures, methods and modularity, value and reference types, coding custom driver and concept classes, class inheritance, interfaces, multi-class applications. Course Instructor:

Students:

CS102 - Introduction to Computer Systems, Networks and Security* (6) - The unit introduces students to fundamentals of computer systems, networks and security. It provides basic knowledge of computer organization and architecture, operating systems, networking architecture, technology and operation. It introduces the concepts of security goals for protecting common modern computer systems and communication networks from adversaries and the deployment of suitable countermeasures to achieve these goals. Course Instructor:

CS103 - Foundations of C++* (6) - This unit introduces programming fundamentals and the Python/C++ language to students. Course Instructor:

CS104 - Operating Systems* (6) - This unit will provide students with the knowledge of how a multi-programming, multi-user operating systems operates and it manages and allocate resources to different applications. Course Instructor:

Students:

CS201 - Software and Network Security (6) - This unit aims to introduce secure software development issues from the design stage, through to implementation, testing and deployment. It will also provide students with an understanding of: OSI security architecture; common information risks and requirements; operation of encryption techniques; digital signatures; public key infrastructure; authentication and non-repudiation; intrusion detection and response; firewall defense; privacy and ethics issues; security configurations to PC-based applications; and design of information systems with security compliance and security standards and protocols. Course Instructor: Yossarian

Students:

CS202 - Computer Networks (6) - The unit introduces computer networks with an explicit software and system-centric focus. It provides foundation skills in data communications, networks, and associated software interfaces, and introduces basic principles in network design, configuration, management and security. Course Instructor: Yossarian

Students:

CS203 - Mobile Application Development (6) - This unit introduces an industrial strength programming language (with supporting software technologies and standards) and object-oriented application development in the context of mobile application development for smartphones and tablets. Course Instructor:

Students:

CS204 - Distributed Computing (6) - This unit provides foundation knowledge and understanding of the basic mechanisms required to implement distributed computing systems, especially clouds, grids, web services and clusters. Course Instructor:

CS301 - Computer Architecture (6) - This unit covers the internal mechanism of computers and how they are organized and programmed. Course Instructor:

CS302 - IT Forensics (6) - This unit provides a broad coverage of digital ICT forensics. Students will examine definitions of evidence as they apply to investigations involving the seizure and examination of information technology devices. Course Instructor:

Criminology

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least 18 points in Level 3.

CRIM 101 - Understanding Crime* (6) - Crime is an issue that citizens and governments confront on a daily basis. The causes of crime, and how it should be dealt with, are the focus of intense and on-going debate. That debate is examined in this unit. Students analyze the meaning, nature, and extent of crime, examine how crime is portrayed in the media, evaluate the effect images of crime can have on our perceptions of the crime problem, and how it should be addressed. Course Instructor: Professor Harrison Cavanaugh

Students: Regan

CRIM 102 - Criminal Justice* (6) - This unit explores the operation of the major institutions of the criminal justice system in the United States and analyses current debates surrounding the outcomes of the system. The police, courts and sentencing, punishment and prisons and alternative community-based schemes will be investigated. Course Instructor:

Students:

CRIM 201 - Crime, Risk and Security (6) - This unit provides a theoretical background to the challenges facing contemporary criminology nationally and internationally, identifying and interrogating the narratives that make up the diverse perceptions of crime, the evolution of 'risk society', ideas of local and global security/insecurity and the impact this has on rights and liberties. Course Instructor:

Students:

CRIM 202 - Prisons, Power and Punishment (6) - Students read, analyze and discuss theories and histories of punishment. In particular students examine the differential experiences associated with early punishments and imprisonment on socially disadvantaged groups according to gender, race, class and ability. Course Instructor:

CRIM 203 - Crime, Media and Culture (6) - Examines the representation of crime in the media and its relationship to wider understandings of, and reactions to, crime and criminal justice. Course Instructor:

Students:

CRIM 204 - Victims, Justice and the Law (6) - The unit considers the concepts of justice, victims and the law as they exist within and beyond the legal system. Course Instructor: Professor Harrison Cavanaugh

Students:

CRIM 301 - Race, Crime and Difference (6) - This unit will examine the ways in which Criminology has dealt with issues of race, difference and inequality in crime and criminal justice. Course Instructor:

CRIM 302 - Crime, Control and Policing (6) - This unit critically analyses concepts of policing and control both by and beyond the state. Course Instructor: Professor Harrison Cavanaugh

CRIM 303 - Sex, Gender and Crime (6) - This unit examines the intersection of sex and crime, and the role gender stereotypes play in the operation of the criminal justice system. Course Instructor:

CRIM 304 - Comparative Criminology (12) - The unit introduces students to the comparative study of criminology which involves the study of crime and social control across different cultural contexts. Students spend 2 weeks attached to a Canadian Police Station to experience different attitudes to crime. Course Instructor:

CRIM 305 - The CSI Fallacy (6) - An introduction to forensic procedures, focusing on those which occur with miraculous alacrity in procedural crime dramas. Course Instructor:

Education

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least 18 points in Level 2 and 18 points in Level 3.

EDU 101 - Education Foundations* (6) - This subject will introduce students to the physical, social, emotional and cognitive development of children. The aim of the subject is to provide a sound theoretical foundation for further studies in education and psychology. While the focus is on children’s holistic development, the major focus is on concepts and theories related to children’s cognitive development and learning from birth to 18 years. Course instructor:

EDU 102 - Technology and Education* (6) - This subject explores research about the benefits of using technology with infants and young children as well as practical examples of resources useful for all year education. Course instructor:

EDU 103 - Child Sociology* (6) - This subject will provide students with the opportunity to explore a range of sociological approaches to understanding historical and contemporary conceptions of childhood and the impact these have on infants and children and their families. Course instructor:

EDU 104 - Child Development and Care* (6) - This subject supports students to develop knowledge about theories of child development and care and introduces a research basis for further exploration, analysis and application. Course instructor:

EDU 201 - Early Intervention (6) - This subject addresses the need for all childhood educators to be aware of the importance of early intervention when working with children and families with complex and multiple needs. Course instructor:

EDU 202 - Teaching Science (6) - This subject is designed to provide students with an understanding of curriculum, teaching approaches, science activities and theory related to implementing science with children. Course instructor:

EDU 203 - Teaching Math (6) - This subject is designed to provide students with an understanding of curriculum, teaching approaches, science activities and theory related to implementing math with children. Course instructor:

EDU 204 - Teaching the Arts (6) - This subject is designed to provide students with an understanding of curriculum, teaching approaches, science activities and theory related to implementing art subjects with children. Course instructor:

EDU 205 - Teaching Physical Exercise (6) - This subject is designed to provide students with an understanding of curriculum, teaching approaches, science activities and theory related to implementing physical exercise with children. Course instructor:

EDU 206 - Curriculum (6) - The art and science of establishing curriculum and assessment methods. Course instructor:

EDU 301 - Teaching Literature (6) - This subject is designed to provide students with an understanding of curriculum, teaching approaches, science activities and theory related to implementing advanced literature with children. Course instructor:

EDU 302 - Creating Creativity (6) - This subject is designed to provide students with an understanding of curriculum, teaching approaches, science activities and theory related to implementing creativity with children. Course instructor:

EDU 303 - Teaching History and Geography (6) - This subject is designed to provide students with an understanding of curriculum, teaching approaches, science activities and theory related to implementing history and geography with children. Course instructor:

EDU 304 - Teacher as Manager (6) - This course explores the administration requirements and management techniques of being a teacher. Course instructor:

EDU 305 - Teaching Advanced Math and Sciences (6) - This subject is designed to provide students with an understanding of curriculum, teaching approaches, science activities and theory related to implementing advanced math and science with children. Course instructor:

EDU 306 - School Placement (8) - Students work as a teacher aid in a local school where they can learn the practicalities of teaching. Course instructor:



Engineering

Degree requires completion of at least 36 points of Units including at least 12 points at each level.

ENG 100 - Safety Induction* (0) - This compulsory zero credit point unit is a program of safety information for students involved in mechanical and electronics laboratory work. Course Instructor:

ENG 101 - Engineering Fundamentals* (6) - The unit will commence with a calculus treatment of kinematics of motion in one, two and three dimensions, including parabolic motion. Course Instructor:

ENG 102 - Design Linguistics* (6) - This unit is designed to introduce the student to the use of psychology as a design tool and how, with skilled application and understanding, it can influence meaning, context, and identity both from a physical and emotional perspective. Course Instructor:

ENG 103 - Design Proposals* (6) - This is a project that focuses on problem description and communication of possible solutions. The aim is to apply design thinking to actual, real-world problems and use the associated tools to generate conceptual model solutions. Course Instructor:

ENG 104 - Design Fundamentals* (6) - Focuses on the principles and practice of design. Course Instructor:

ENG 201 - Design Solutions (6) - This project concentrates on the ability for a group of students to describe and solve problems in a technical manner. Course Instructor:

ENG 202 - Mathematical Methods I (6) - Aims to develop student understanding of the fundamental functions of applied mathematics, and to introduce calculus to students who have not previously studied it in secondary school. Course Instructor:

ENG 203 - Mathematical Modeling I (6) - Applications studied include approximations to solutions of equations and integrals and formulation of models to solve science and engineering problems. Course Instructor:

ENG 204 - Mathematical Methods II (6) - Aims to develop advanced student understanding of the fundamental functions of applied mathematics, and to introduce calculus to students who have not previously studied it in secondary school. Course Instructor:

ENG 205 - Mathematical Modeling II (6) - Applications studied include advanced approximations to solutions of equations and integrals and formulation of models to solve science and engineering problems. Course Instructor:

ENG 206 - Structural Engineering (6) - This course looks at building construction. Course Instructor:

ENG 301 - Design Engineering (6) - This course looks at how design can affect construction and vice versa. Course Instructor:

ENG 302 - Underground Engineering (6) - This course looks at the construction of underground facilities. Course Instructor:

ENG 303 - Liquid Engineering (6) - This course looks at the construction of objects that will have interaction with water or other liquids . Course Instructor:

ENG 304 - Mechanical Engineering (6) - This course looks at mechanical design. Course Instructor:

ENG 305 - Invisible Engineering (6) - This course looks at the art of concealing engineering. Course Instructor:

ENG 306 - Environmental Engineering (6) - This course looks at ensuring engineering does not work against the environment and how to create sustainable artefacts. Course Instructor:

ENG 307 - Practical Design Research (8) - This project concentrates on the individual knowledge and skills of the students in a project-based environment. Course Instructor:



Environmental Studies

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least 18 points in Level 2 and 18 points in Level 3.
Students: Fiachra

ENV 101 - Biology* (6) - A study of the biology of whole organisms, organ systems and cells, including molecular genetics, and the effect of environmental parameters on biological functions. The biology of microbes and animals is emphasized.

ENV 102 - Environmental Biology* (6) - A study of the biosphere, environmental conditions and their effects on animals, plants and communities; responses of organisms to environmental conditions; interactions between plants and animals; environmental genetics and microbiology; management of biological resources; and an introduction to ecology and the impact of humans on the environment.


ENV 103 - Botany (6) - A basic overview of the fundamental principles of Botanical Science with special attention to taxonomy and to the plant life of Maine. Students are requested to enroll in one Lecture section and one Lab session.

  • Course Instructor:


ENV 201 - Ecology and Biodiversity (6) - Topics include the scope and approaches of ecological enquiry; abiotic and biotic factors determining distributions; population growth and regulation; species interactions; patterns and maintenance of biodiversity; food web analysis; disturbance and succession; and production ecology and nutrient cycling. Particular emphasis is placed on integrating ecological processes across spatial and temporal scales. Course Instructor:

ENV 202 - Evolutionary Ecology (6) - This unit introduces students to the patterns and processes of evolution by natural selection. It investigates what species are, how to recognize them, how they are described and classified, and the range of circumstances and mechanisms under which they form in nature. Course Instructor:

ENV 203 - Conservation Biology (6) - This unit deals with threats to the environment associated with human activities and potential solutions to redress their impacts. Course Instructor: Dr. Neil Ravenwood

ENV 204 - Trends in Ecology (6) - This unit will investigate what's hot in the science of ecology and how we got there by following the history of ecological ideas and the people behind them through to the big questions that remain unanswered in ecology today. Course Instructor: Dr. Neil Ravenwood

ENV 301 - Socio-Ecological Research Methods (6) - "This course is designed to train students to conduct research in the area of human-environment interactions. Such interactions include humans extracting important renewable and non-renewable natural resources such as fish and forests, as well as producing wastes, such as greenhouse gases, as the result of modern economic activities." - Course Instructor: Dr. Alexandra Lawrence

ENV 302 - Ecological Applications (6) - The unit will focus on teaching core skills in applied ecology that should inform any management process. Course Instructor:

ENV 303 - Evolutionary and Ecological Genetics (6) - This unit will take an evolutionary and ecological genetics approach to understanding evolution. It will describe how the four evolutionary forces, mutation, random genetic drift, natural selection and gene flow act within and between populations to cause evolutionary change. Course Instructor:

ENV 304 - Animal Diversity (6) - Examines the diversity of animals and organizes them in a systematic way using their evolutionary history. Course Instructor:Dr. Alexandra Lawrence

ENV 305 - Genetics in Action Research Project (12) - This unit provides the opportunity for high-achieving students to undertake an individual research project in Genetics with an academic supervisor. Course sponsored by GENCorp. Course Instructor:



Film Studies

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least 18 points in Level 3.

FLM 101 - Television Studies* (6) - Employing textual criticism, critical theory and theories of political economy, this unit will introduce a variety of approaches to the study of television. Course Instructor:

FLM 102 - Film Studies* (6) - This introductory unit aims to acquaint students with basic principles of film studies, including film theory and history. Course Instructor: Professor Ira Shain.

FLM 103 - Contemporary Approaches to Film and Television* (6) - This unit will introduce students to new approaches in the production, consumption and study of film and screen texts. Course Instructor:

FLM 201 - Storytelling in Film and Television (6) - This unit analyses texts that are representative of the stylistic diversity found in film and television. Course Instructor:

FLM 202 - Performing Film and Television Criticism with New Technologies (6) - This unit will provide students an opportunity to apply disciplinary ways of performing film and television theory, criticism and history. Course Instructor:

FLM 203 - Gender and Sexuality in Film and Television (6) - Surveys different ways in which scholars have understood the relationship between film and television and the viewer. Course Instructor: Professor Ira Shain.

FLM 204 - Long-form Television (6) - This unit traces the development of one of the most visible and successful outcomes of these shiftsglobal long-form television series that experiment boldly with complex serial narratives, self-conscious stylistics and provocative themes and characters. Course Instructor:

FLM 205 - Documentary and Realism in Film and Television (6) - Examines approaches to documentary film and television through addressing questions of realism, reality, truth, indexicality and the boundary between fiction and non-fiction. Course Instructor:

FLM 206 - Film Studies (6) - Focuses either on the works of a single director or on the works representing an established genre. Classes will be taught off-campus at the Empire Theater at no additional cost. The Spring 2016 semester will focus on the films of Alfred Hitchcock. Two term papers will be required, and there will be a weekly discussion group, but no quizzes or exams. Course Instructor: Professor Ira Shain.

FLM 301 - History and Film (6) - This unit examines film as a source of historical evidence and inquiry. Course Instructor:

FLM 302 - Alternatives in Film and Television (6) - Alternatives in film and television raises questions of aesthetics and politics to consider a varied body of work, one considered 'alternative' in relation to 'dominant' cultural practice and value. Course Instructor:

FLM 303 - Film and Television Institutions (6) - Film and television institutions considers a number of institutionalised and unofficial public and industrial discourses that support contemporary film and television texts and industries. Course Instructor:

FLM 304 - Society and Film (6) - The unit aims to develop an awareness of different critical approaches to film analysis, including genre, style and the interaction between films and their socio-cultural contexts. Course Instructor:

FLM 305 - Channel 31 Work Experience (12) - Work experience at Channel 31 helping with the production of news reports and local television shows. Course Instructor:



Finance

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

FIN 101 - Foundations of Finance* (6) - This unit introduces students to the concepts of finance, financial mathematics, investment analysis, the financial system, risk management and the relationship of finances to other commercial disciplines. Course Instructor:

FIN 102 - Corporate Finance* (6) - The aim of the unit is to introduce students to the theory and application of why and how value enhancing corporate financial decisions are made and implemented. Course Instructor:

FIN 103 - International Finance* (6) - The aim of the unit is to introduce students to the theory, practice and application financial concepts internationally. Course Instructor:

FIN 104 - Derivatives* (6) - This unit examines the institutional features of futures and options markets, the use of futures, options and other derivatives in arbitraging, trading and hedging, and prices of these instruments. Course Instructor:

FIN 201 - Modelling in Finance (6) - This unit examines the techniques and systems of modelling financial products and theories. Course Instructor:

FIN 202 - Econometrics (6) - This unit introduces students to the empirical analysis of relationships between economic variables. Course Instructor:

FIN 203 - Financial Institutions and Markets (6) - The unit provides a broad overview of the functioning of a developed financial system. Course Instructor:

FIN 204 - Equities and Investments (6) - The unit examines the concepts of portfolio investments. Course Instructor:

FIN 205 - Debt Markets and Fixed Income Securities(6) - The unit examines the concepts of cash flows, short-term markets and bonds. Course Instructor:

FIN 301 - Pension and Financial Planning (6) - The unit examines the concepts of superannuation, retirement and related products. Course Instructor:

FIN 302 - Property Investment (6) - This unit considers characteristics of property investment. Course Instructor:

FIN 303 - Finance Law (6) - Aspects of the legal and regulatory environment that affects financial decisions, transactions and relationships. Course Instructor:

FIN 304 - International Study Program in Banking and Investment (6) - The unit is designed to provide students with the conceptual foundations of the functions and institutions of the international financial system.

FIN 305 - Practical Investments (12) - Students are tasked to make a small investment grow using all they have learned. Course Instructor:

Students: Summer Cavanaugh (Minor)



Fine Art

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

Students: Cara, Chantal, Mikoto

ART 101 - Fine Arts I* (6) - A journey through the soul of art, creativity and intuition. It focuses in mind shattering experiences through the practice of philosophy, crafts, painting and dramaturgy. Be ready to be challenged. Course Instructor:

ART 102 - Fine Arts II* (6) - A journey through the soul of art, creativity and intuition. It focuses in mind shattering experiences through the practice of philosophy, crafts, painting and dramaturgy. Be ready to be challenged. Course Instructor:

ART 103 - Fine Arts III (6) - A journey through the soul of art, creativity and intuition. It focuses in mind shattering experiences through the practice of philosophy, crafts, painting and dramaturgy. Be ready to be challenged. Course Instructor: Carl

ART 104 - Fine Arts IV (6) - A journey through the soul of art, creativity and intuition. It focuses in mind shattering experiences through the practice of philosophy, crafts, painting and dramaturgy. Be ready to be challenged." Course Instructor: Carl

ART 201 - Life, Death and Morality (6) - This unit is a study of moral philosophy. Course Instructor:

ART 202 - Time, Self and Mind (6) - This unit is a study of metaphysics (or is it?). Course Instructor:

ART 203 - Ethics(6) - This unit covers some central debates in ethical theory. Course Instructor:

ART 204 - Sculpture (6) - This unit allows students to develop their sculptural skills. Course Instructor:

ART 205 - Watercolours (6) - This unit allows students to develop their painting skills. Course Instructor:

ART 206 - Drama as Societal Metaphor (6) - This unit allows students to develop their acting skills. Course Instructor:

ART 301 - Language, Truth and Power (6) - This unit will examine how ways of speaking and communicating create, modify or conform to specific social roles, and how these roles exert pressure on our everyday actions. Course Instructor:

ART 302 - After the Death of God (6) - This unit deals with the way in which 'continental' philosophers have sought to deal with the question of the divine in modernity, in the face of the growth of scientific modes of explanation and the decline of religious institutions and belief. Course Instructor:

ART 303 - Working in Oils (6) - Painting with oils and the interpretation of fine art. Course Instructor:

ART 304 - Sculpture in Advanced Mediums (6) - Sculpting in metals, marble and the role of impressionism in 3-D expression. Course Instructor: Carl

ART 305 - Computer Art (6) - Exploring artistic endeavors through the medium of the computer. Is it art or is the PC doing all the work? Course Instructor:

ART 306 - The Philosophy of Acting (6) - Exploring drama as a cultural peak. Course Instructor:

ART 307 - Fine Art Project(12) - A practical exercise for students to create and present a work of fine art in their chosen specialty. Course Instructor: Carl

Funeral/Morturary Science

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least 18 points in Level 3.

Students:

FSM 101 - The Body In A Health Care Context* (6) - An introduction to the biology of the human body through the prism of health care and funeral services. Course Instructor:

FSM 102 - Introduction to Funeral Operations* (6) - An overview of funeral arrangements in a civil and religious context. Course Instructor:

FSM 103 - Business Management* (6) - How to manage a business with special attention to those in fields of high emotion. Includes work safety requirements. Course Instructor:

FSM 201 - Managing Personal Stressors in the Work Environment (6) - With such a high stress occupation, it is important to be able to manage yourself and staff professionally. Course Instructor:

FSM 202 - Effective Communication (6) - How to interact with the grieving and the business minded. Course Instructor:

FSM 203 - Handling and Storing of Medical Waste (6) - Learn your legal, ethical and moral requirements in the handling of human bodies and waste. Course Instructor:

FSM 204 - Autopsies and Embalming (6) - The procedures of autopsies and the embalming of humans. Course Instructor:

FSM 205 - Maintaining A Mortuary (6) - The legal, moral and business requirements of operating a mortuary. Course Instructor:

FSM 301 - Conducting Services (6) - Learn how to conduct services as required by Maine law. From a simple service to public wakes. Course Instructor:

FSM 302 - Corpse Make-Up and Restoration (6) - Learn the arts of making the deceased as perfect as the bereaved remember. Course Instructor:

FSM 303 - Religion and Services (6) - How different religions affect the services and preparation of bodies. Course Instructor:

FSM 304 - Animal Services (6) - Services for pets is a growing field and requires different techniques and corpse preparations. Course Instructor:

FSM 305 - Infection Policies (6) - How to deal with possibly infected subjects and related government policies. Course Instructor:

FSM 306 - Small Business Activities (6) - How to negotiate contracts, run a business and deal with business and tax law. Course Instructor:

FSM 307 - Media Liaison (6) - What happens when you are running the funeral of someone famous? How to deal with media. Course Instructor:

Games Development

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 2.

Students:

GD 101 - Foundations of C++* (6) - This unit introduces programming fundamentals and the Python/C++ language to students. The unit provides a foundational understanding of program design and implementation of algorithms to solve simple problems. Course Instructor:

GD 102 - Foundations of 3D* (6) - This unit is an introduction to the techniques, frameworks and processes comprising 3D modelling and 3D imaging. Course Instructor:

GD 103 - Game Programming I* (6) - This unit will further develop object-oriented programming skills with the C++ language, and place them into the Games Programming context. Course Instructor:

GD 104 - Game Design Studio* (6) - This unit provides a foundation in the theoretical and practical principles of game design and game narrative structures in the games development process. Utilising the principles taught in this unit, students will be given the opportunity to design innovative game applications and implement the consequences of their decisions as working game prototypes. Course Instructor:

GD 201 - Artificial Life and Virtual Environments (6) - This unit introduces Artificial Life (A-Life) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques used to model plant and animal behavior and interactions, especially in the context of dynamic, virtual environments. Course Instructor:

GD 202 - Emergent Technologies and Interfaces (6) - This unit will focus on research into the latest developments in the field of information technology, including innovative technology developments involving human computer interaction, information visualisation of complex data and emerging interface techniques. Course Instructor:

GD 203 - Platform Design (6) - Working and programming with the multitude of platforms now available to games. Course Instructor:

GD 204 - Storytelling (6) - How to tell a story with multiple paths, believable characters and situations, and a satisfying conclusion(s). Course Instructor:

GD 205 - Marketing (6) - It is no good designing a great game when no one knows about it. Learn how to market your game in various platforms to the right audience. Course Instructor:

GD 301 - Game Design Project (12) - Design an app game from start to finish and then market to the world. Course Instructor:

Gender Studies

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units.

GS 101 - Gender Studies* (6) - This unit shows how gender is the primary analytical category across multidisciplinary fields of study in global contexts. Course Instructor:

GS 102 - Sexuality Studies* (6) - This unit shows how sexuality is the primary analytical category across multidisciplinary fields of study in global contexts, e.g. culture or the Arts, media and communications, business or economy, education or pedagogy, sociology, politics, psychology or sports, sciences or health and religion or theology. Course Instructor:

GS 201 - Critical Methodologies for Action Research (6) - This unit engages with two key critical modes of inquiry: feminist and queer which are distinctive methodologies for Gender Studies and Sexuality Studies. Course Instructor:

GD 202 - Genders, Sexualities and Religion in North America (6) - This unit explores the intersections of genders, sexualities and religions within the political, social-cultural context of North America. Course Instructor:

GD 203 - Contemporary Feminism (6) - This unit as a whole explores what constitutes feminist knowledge and practices in North America. Course Instructor:

GD 204 - Sex and the Silver Screen (6) - The presentation of sex in film and television from the pre-code days through various levels of censorship to the 'free' depictions of today. Course Instructor:

GD 301 - Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in Global Contexts (6) - This unit explores key debates, issues and concerns related to Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in global contexts. Course Instructor:

GD 302 - Stardom: Celebrity, Society and Power (6) - This course will offer a thorough interrogation of the star phenomenon, combining theoretical work derived from the field of 'star studies' with empirical analyses of specific films and stars. Course Instructor:

GD 303 - Workplace Internship (12) - The internship provides students with the opportunity to integrate theory with practice, and to gain first-hand experience in working in the area of specialty in which they want to pursue after graduation. Course Instructor:



Geography

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

GEO 101 - Human Geography (6)* - This unit aims to equip students with basic concepts in human geography required to understand, interpret and synthesise information on the world around us.

  • Course Instructor:
  • Students: Fiachra

GEO 102 - Physical Geography (6)* - This unit deals with the basic understanding of the landscape, vegetation and climate characteristics of the world as a foundation for more advanced study in geography and related disciplines. Course Instructor:

GEO 103 - Environmental Impact Assessment (6)* - This unit uses case studies from the South America region and international situations to examine processes used for Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA), the compilation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the effect of both on the public. Course Instructor:

GEO 104 - Climatology (6)* - The unit is linked to the subject of climatology which is the science that seeks to describe and explain the nature of climate, why it differs from place to place, and how it relates to other elements of the natural environment and to human activities. Course Instructor:

GEO 201 - Urban planning and development (6) - Cities are dynamic and complex environments that now comprise the majority of the world we live in but they face an array of major challenges. Course Instructor:

GEO 202 - The Science of Geology (6) - This unit explores geological science and how geology underpins and affects geographical studies. Course Instructor:

GEO 203 - Geographical Information Systems (6) - The unit introduces GIS (Geographical Information Systems) and discusses basic principles, techniques and applications of GIS in the field of geography and environmental science. Course Instructor:

GEO 204 - Environmental Policy and Resource Management (6) - This unit aims to maintain and improve the state of the environment and its resources affected by human activities. Course Instructor:

GEO 301 - Field Studies in Regional Sustainability (12) - The unit explores the concepts of regional development and sustainability, and draws attention to the practical constraints and issues associated with translating such concepts into regional policy and practice. Students will spend one month on site (location to be determined). Course Instructor:

GEO 302 - Methodological Issues in the Social Sciences (6) - Sociological research requires the capacity to think conceptually, to systematically plan how to obtain valid information relevant to research questions and to analyse and evaluate information. Course Instructor:

GEO 303 - The Geography of the Ocean (6) - With so much of Fallcoast's past dependent on the ocean, this unit studies the effect of human interaction with this environment and what can be done to save it. Course Instructor:

GEO 304 - Poverty and Power (6) - The unit looks at the state of global poverty, development and inequalities and analyses the forces that drive them. Course Instructor:

GEO 305 - Geo-Informatics (6) - This unit introduces GIS (Geographical Information Systems) as both an academic discipline and a practical computer based software package. Course Instructor:



History (Ancient)

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

HAN 101 - Ancient Cultures 1* (6) - An introduction to the study of ancient cultures incorporating approaches drawn from archaeology, ancient history and classics, to show how we attempt to understand the ancient past and its relevance to the present. Course Instructor: Professor Collins

HAN 102 - Ancient Cultures 2* (6) - An overview of the ancient cultures focusing upon the issues of territorial and cultural expansion and the rise of imperialism, and associated cultural complexity, internationalism and multiculturalism. Course Instructor: Professor Collins

HAN 201 - Asian Ancient Cultures (6) - An investigation of Asian ancient cultures. Course Instructor:

HAN 202 - Mesoamerican History (6) - An investigation of Mesoamerican history and culture up to the arrival of the Conquistadors. Course Instructor:

HAN 203 - Reading and Researching History (6) - The unit investigates past and current approaches to the study and writing of history. Course Instructor:

HAN 204 - The Rise and Fall of Rome (6) - The unit studies the historical rise and fall of the Roman Republic and Empire and its effects on modern society. Course Instructor:

HAN 301 - Ancient Military Evolution (6) - The unit studies the evolution of warfare through the Ancient Period with attention to tactics, weapon designs, philosophy and cultural effects. Course Instructor: Professor Collins

HAN 302 - Remembering the Past (6) - In this unit we will explore the expanding field of memory studies by considering a series of case studies of how communities and individuals remember the past, from the ancient period to the present. Course Instructor:

HAN 303 - The Golden Age of Athens (6) - The unit focuses upon Athens during the 5th century BCE, the period when, in a burst of creativity, her citizens attained their greatest achievements. Course Instructor:

HAN 304 - Egypt's Golden Age (6) - The study of ancient Egypt throughout the New Kingdom, Dynasties 18-20, when Egypt was one of the dominant powers throughout the Mediterranean. Course Instructor:

HAN 305 - The Rise of the Hellenistic World (6) - The unit focuses on the world created by Alexander into which Kleopatra was born. Course Instructor:

History (Medieval)

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

HME 101 - Medieval Europe* (6) - This unit examines European society from the end of Roman empire to the turbulent fourteenth century. Course Instructor: Ambroise Dubois

HME 102 - Renaissance Europe* (6) - This unit examines European society from the fourteenth to the seventeenth century. Course Instructor: Ambroise Dubois

HME 201 - Conflict and Coexistence I (6) - This unit deals with the social, cultural, political, economic and intellectual interactions of Jews with Christians and Muslims through the Middle Ages. Course Instructor:

HME 202 - Reading and Researching History (6) - The unit investigates past and current approaches to the study and writing of history. Course Instructor: Ambroise Dubois

HME 203 - Shining A Light On the 'Dark Ages' (6) - The unit will explore the historical changes through the so-called 'Dark Ages' when there was actually evolution of culture and society that our current world is based on. Course Instructor: Ambroise Dubois

HME 204 - Medieval Asia (6) - The Medieval period in Asia. How was it similar and how did it differ from the west? Course Instructor:

HME 301 - Medieval Military Evolution (6) - The unit studies the evolution of warfare through the Medieval Period with attention to tactics, weapon designs, philosophy and cultural effects. Course Instructor: Ambroise Dubois

HME 302 - Witches and Depravity in the Medieval World (6) - This unit will consider the cultural history of Western Europe from late antiquity through to the beginnings of modernity. We will focus particularly on the persecution of witches, accused sometimes of fornication with the devil or of infanticide and cannibalism, but will look also at other individuals and groups that have been considered sinful, unnatural, freakish or depraved. Course Instructor: Hiram

HME 303 - Tudor and Stuart England (6) - The unit will study the transition of England from cultural backwater to worldwide naval power. Course Instructor:

HME 304 - Islam: Principles, Civilizations, Influences (6) - This unit examines the evolution and influence of Islam as a religion and civilization, with particular emphasis on the principles underpinning Islamic law and theology and Islamic civilisation in its classic phase. Course Instructor:

HME 305 - Medieval Japan (6) - The cultural and historical study of medieval Japan from the creation of the Shogunate to the arrival of the west. Course Instructor:

History (Modern)

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

HMO 101 - Revolution and Empire* (6) - This unit explores the process of nation building in the "long nineteenth century" through revolution and war. Stretching from the French Revolution to the First World War, the course examines how three key elements - war, revolution, and empire - interacted in the making of modern nation-states. Course Instructor:

HMO 102 - The Twentieth Century* (6) - This unit explores how wars, revolutions, and empires continued to shape the making and re-making of nations - but under new conditions. Course Instructor:

HMO 201 - Conflict and Coexistence II (6) - The unit deals with the interactions between Jews, Christians, and Muslims from the Enlightenment era to the contemporary period. Course Instructor:

HMO 202 - Contemporary Worlds I (6) - This unit is designed to give you the historical background and conceptual tools to understand the contemporary world. Course Instructor:

HMO 203 - Contemporary Worlds II (6) - This unit takes an interdisciplinary approach to introducing students to a selection of the most pressing issues facing the contemporary world. Course Instructor:

HMO 203 - Reading and Researching History (6) - The unit investigates past and current approaches to the study and writing of history. Course Instructor:

HMO 204 - The History of Sexuality 1800 to the present (6) - This unit will examine the changing nature of sexuality in Britain and North America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Course Instructor:

HMO 205 - Race and Rights in 20th Century America (6) - After providing a general overview of the history of the United States in the twentieth century, this unit examines two key themes. 'Race' traces struggles over the meaning of racial difference in America, with a particular emphasis on the civil rights and black protest movements. 'Rights' examines the contest over civil, social and human rights in the United States between 1900 and 2000 and the meaning of 'freedom' for women, cultural minorities and the poor. Course Instructor:

HMO 206 - The Modern Middle East (6) - A study of the historical, ethnic and religious diversity of the Middle East upon which contemporary political complexity is based. Course Instructor:

HMO 301 - Fallcoast (6) - A study of local history and folklore since the establishment of Fallcoast. Course Instructor:

HMO 302 - Slavery (6) - This unit follows changing ideas about slavery and freedom from the mid eighteenth century into the French Revolution and through to the rule of Napoleon. Course Instructor:

HMO 303 - Modern American History (6) - This unit examines the history of the US in the world, asking how a federation of former colonies on the eastern seaboard became a continental and then international power. Course Instructor:

HMO 304 - History and the Future (6) - The study of how the lessons of history seem to be ignored and incidents repeated over and over again. What can be done to finally learn wisdom from the past? Course Instructor:

HMO 305 - Fascism - Did It Win? (6) - The western world places great store in how it has defeated oppression and tyranny throughout history but as the people of democratic countries become more racist, extremist, xenophobic, and security intensive, who really won the war? Course Instructor:

HMO 306 - The American Civil War (6) - The study of the causes, history and cultural effects of the American Civil War that still mark the country today. Course Instructor:



Indigenous Studies

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

INS 101 - Social Justice and Indigenous Americans* (6) - The unit introduces students to ideas of social justice and Indigenous rights, focusing on the role of the state and its obligations to the international community, and Indigenous human and civil rights and self-determination. Course Instructor:

INS 102 - Culture, Power and Difference* (6) - This unit will explore connections and contestation aspects through focusing on the ongoing relationship between Indigenous and Settler Americans. Course Instructor:

INS 201 - Race and Power (6) - This unit critically examines the ability of America to know Indigenous people through the discursive power of representation. Course Instructor:

INS 202 - Heritage, Culture and Land vs The Law (6) - This unit undertakes an interdisciplinary study related to Indigenous Law, land rights, Native Title, Indigenous knowledge and cultural heritage. Course Instructor:

INS 203 - Colonialism in Comparison (6) - The unit will examine the lives of indigenous people in North America and their experiences of colonisation. Course Instructor:

INS 204 - Indigenous Peoples Globally (6) - This unit introduces students to basic issues connected with indigeneity globally. Course Instructor:

INS 205 - Native American Languages (6) - An overview of Native American languages and their evolution since the arrival of settlers. Course Instructor:

INS 301- Passamaquoddy (6) – instruction in the native language of the local tribe, developing into a survey of tribal literature and traditions over Canadian (and Quebecois) bands as well as ones resident in the USA. Course instructor:

INS 302 - Visualizing Cultures (6) - This unit explores the relation between film and ethnography by examining how cultures are 'visualised' - documented and represented on celluloid, usually in productions that are aimed at an educational audience rather than one that seeks pure entertainment. Course Instructor:

INS 303 - Perspectives On Indigenous Art (6) - In this unit, students examine early and recent forms of Indigenous visual traditions (e.g. rock-art, tattoos, paintings, sculpture) to learn about their role and significance in Indigenous societies. Course Instructor:

INS 304 - Indigenous Residence Project (12) - Students will spend a fortnight in a Native American community to experience the culture and current lifestyle of Indigenous peoples. Course Instructor:



Information and Library Management

Degree requires completion of at least 30 points of Units.

INF 101 - Introduction to Business Information Systems* (6) The unit provides a basic introduction to fundamental information systems concepts including basic business concepts, information technology strategy and governance, sourcing, the different kinds of IT systems at both enterprise and desktop scales, introduction to architectures and professional practice and introductory project management. Course Instructor:

INF 102 - Systems Analysis and Design* (6) This unit introduces students to the key principles which underlie the analysis and design of information systems to support business and other organizational undertakings. Course Instructor:

INF 103 - Databases* (6) This unit will introduce the concept of data management in an organization through relational database technology. Course Instructor:

INF 201 - Programming (6) This unit aims to provide students with the basic concepts involved in the development of well structured software using a programming language. Course Instructor:

INF 202 - Archival Systems (6) This unit relates to the fundamental role of recordkeeping professionals in society - to provide access to recorded information in the form of essential evidence of social and organizational activity for business, commercial, governmental, social, and cultural purposes. Course Instructor:

INF 203 - Knowledge Management Systems (6) This unit provides students with the skills and knowledge relating to the use of latest technologies for managing knowledge, electronic documents and records to meet the needs of individuals, work groups and organizations. Course Instructor:

INF 204 - Information Access and Use (6) This unit introduces students to the major categories of information resources in all media and how they are accessed through a variety of common user interfaces from anywhere in the world. Course Instructor:

INF 205 - Social Infomatics (6) This unit provides students with a critical understanding of the impact of information technology (IT) within contemporary social relations. Course Instructor:

INF 206 - Information Organization(6) This unit develops understanding of the fundamental principles, concepts and standards that guide the development of information organization and retrieval systems and web-based information architectures. Course Instructor:



Journalism

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

JN 101 - Foundations of Journalism* (6) - The unit relates the practice of journalism to the study of journalism and how it operates in contemporary American society. Course Instructor:

JN 102 - Practice of Journalism* (6) - The unit introduces the key practices of research and reporting for news journalism, including the technical production and narrative conventions for print and online media. Course Instructor:

JN 103 - News and Power* (6) - This unit provides students with an opportunity for a critical engagement with contemporary scholarship on the sociology and political economy of news production. Course Instructor:

JN 104 - Reporting Digital News* (6) - This unit provides a detailed exploration of the production practices, resources, technologies and genres of reporting digital news, including video, audio, graphic and interactive formats. Course Instructor:

JN 201 - Documentary (6) - This unit explores long-form journalism in radio and video formats in broadcast and online environments. Course Instructor:

JN 202 - Advanced Writing and Interviewing (6) - Advanced writing and interviewing helps students refine their interviewing, researching and writing skills. The course will emphasise accuracy and critical-thinking skills. Course Instructor:

JN 203 - Feature Writing (6) - The unit provides the essential tools and learnings required to research and write in a variety of feature styles. Course Instructor:

JN 204 - Photojournalism (6) - The unit will review the history and ethics of photojournalism, and will develop skills in the planning, taking, editing and presentation of news photographs, using industry-standard technologies. Course Instructor:

JN 205 - Investigative Reporting (6) - This unit provides a detailed exploration of the research and reporting practices for in depth investigative reporting. Course Instructor:

JN 206 - Editing and Design (6) - This unit provides a detailed exploration of the main sub-editing, editing and design practices for print and online media. Course Instructor:

JN 207 - Smartphone Journalism (6) - Students will learn how to use smartphones to engage in real-world journalistic practices, including interviewing, gathering information, recording audio, shooting video, taking photographs, scripting stories and delivering content to deadline. Course Instructor:

JN 301 - Video Journalism (6) - The unit provides a detailed exploration of the production practices, resources, technologies and genres of Video Journalism, including broadcast and online modes. Course Instructor:

JN 302 - Journalism and Global Change (6) - This unit explores the significance of people power to journalism and role of journalism in empowering the dispossessed. Course Instructor:

JN 303 - Channel 31 Placement (12) - A placement with Channel 31 news introduces students to the fast-paced, challenging and exciting operation of a fully functional television studio. Course Instructor:

JN 304 - Print Media Placement (12) - A placement with a newspaper introduces students to the fast-paced, challenging and exciting operation of print journalism. Course Instructor:

JN 305 - Internet Journalism Project (12) - Students will spend the semester supplying reports to an internet news site. Course Instructor:



Law

Degree requires completion of at least 54 points of Units including at least 18 points in Levels 3 or 4.

LAW 101 - Foundations of American Law* (6) - An introduction to Federal law. Course Instructor: Marek Vasily

LAW 102 - Foundations of Maine Law (6) - An introduction to Maine law. Course Instructor:

LAW 103 - Lawyers, Justice and Ethics* (6) - Examines the role, operation and effect of law in society, focusing on the part that lawyers play as the principal representatives and interpreters of the legal system, and on perceptions of justice in and through law. Course Instructor:

LAW 104 - Torts* (6) - When a person has been harmed by the conduct of another it is the law of torts which determines who has to bear the loss. Course Instructor:

LAW 105 - Criminal Law and Procedure* (6) - This course introduces students to the sources of law which define general principles of criminal responsibility, and to a selection of substantive criminal offences and criminal defenses as well as to criminal procedure. Course Instructor: Marek Vasily

LAW 201 - Contracts (6) - The Contracts course is one of the foundation subjects in the law program and examines a central aspect of the law of obligations. Course Instructor:

LAW 202 - Administrative Law (6) - Administrative Law examines the legal framework for controlling decision-making by Federal, State and local government decision-makers in America. Course Instructor:

LAW 203 - Corporate Law (6) - This course provides an understanding of American corporate law. Course Instructor:

LAW 204 - Property Law (6) - This course provides an overview of the law governing personal and real property, emphasizing the concepts of possession and title, the fragmentation of proprietary interests, and the various ways in which common law and legislation resolve disputes between competing interests. Course Instructor:

LAW 205 - Equity and Trusts (6) - The objective of the course is to provide students with an overall understanding of the law of equity with special emphasis on fiduciary obligations, trusts, equitable assignment of property and equitable remedies. Course Instructor:

LAW 301 - Evidence (6) - This course covers important aspects of fact-finding and the adducing and admissibility of evidence in legal proceedings. Course Instructor:

LAW 302 - Scientific Techniques (6) - This course covers the use and reliability of forensic and other scientific evidence. Course Instructor:

LAW 303 - Litigation and Dispute Management (6) - This course is an introduction to dispute resolution focusing upon mediation and civil litigation. Course Instructor:

LAW 304 - Legal Theory(6) - This course explores a number of important theoretical issues concerning law. Course Instructor:

LAW 305 - Community and Authority (6) - The techniques of working with the community and law enforcement groups - both as prosecution and defense. Course Instructor:

LAW 306 - Research (6) - The techniques of researching cases and the broad array of sources available. Course Instructor:

LAW 401 - Law and Society (6) - Law as a social and cultural product; the interrelationships between law and social institutions. Course Instructor:

LAW 402 - Constitutional Law (6) - Understand the constitutional uses and protections of law in relation to the individual person. Course Instructor:

LAW 403 - International Law (6) - This course deals with the body of law known as International Law or sometimes 'Public International Law', as distinct from 'Private International Law'. Course Instructor:

LAW 404 - Case Work (8) - Students are given an assistant position on a real case. Course Instructor: Marek Vasily

Languages and Linguistics

Degree requires completion of at least 36 points of Units including at least 18 points in Levels 2 or 3.

Professors: Isolde (Languages)

LNG 101 - Intro to Linguistics* (6) - Understand the fundamentals of linguistics; includes basic rules comparison and introduction to the main alphabets used in today's contemporary and modern global societies. Course Instructor:

LNG 102 - Language and Society* (6) - This course surveys the main concepts and methods used to analyse language within different social settings. Course Instructor:

LNG 103 - Cross-Cultural Communication* (6) - This course offers a meaning based-approach to cross-cultural communication. Course Instructor:

LNG 104 - Language I (6) - Introduction to the language of the student's choice. Course Instructor:

LNG 201 - Language II (6) - Further study in the language of the student's choice. Course Instructor:

LNG 202 - Syntax (6) - In this course students will become acquainted with the fundamental concepts of syntax and with a wide variety of syntactic structures found in the world's languages and will develop skills in syntactic analysis. Course Instructor:

LNG 203 - Semantics (6) - This course introduces students to the basic problems in the study of meaning, in all areas of language (vocabulary, grammar, discourse). Course Instructor:

LNG 204 - Phonetics (6) - Speech is the most important medium through which we convey our ideas, emotions and identity. Course Instructor:

LNG 205 - Study of a Language Group (6) - Comparative study of a selected language family (to vary each year). Course Instructor:

LNG 206 - Philosophy of Language (6) - In this course, we will cover some of the main themes in the philosophy of language. Course Instructor:

LNG 301 - Language III (6) - Advanced study in the language of the student's choice. Course Instructor:

LNG 302 - Morphology (6) - The course will investigate how word structure is organized in languages, and the major methodological approaches that have been used to study it. Course Instructor:

LNG 303 - Teaching Languages (6) - This course will focus on the theory and practice of language teaching. Course Instructor:

LNG 304 - Language Practical (8) - Academic approved project conducted by the student in the language they have chosen to study. Course Instructor:

Literary Studies (English)

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least 18 points in Level 3.

LIT 101 - Introducing Literature* (6) - The unit will introduce students to ways of reading and writing about literature that will equip them for further study of literatures in English, creative writing, and international literatures comparative literary studies. Course Instructor:

LIT 102 - Literary Genres* (6) - This unit introduces students to the important notion of literary forms and genres which provides a complementary way of approaching literature to the previous semester's unit. Course Instructor:

LIT 201 - Poetry (6) - The subject examines the tradition of modern poetry and poetics and its applicability to contemporary writing practice from a comparative approach. Course Instructor: Eugene Thorpe

LIT 202 - Fiction Writing (6) - In the collaborative atmosphere of workshops, students will use a range of set readings to experiment with the elements of fiction: narrative technique and point of view, characterization, story, plotting and action, setting, figurative language etc., editing skills and preparing a manuscript for publication. Course Instructor:

LIT 203 - Literature and Modernism (6) - This unit will examine some of the major figures of avant-garde and 'High' modernism but it will also be attentive to examples of regional, 'middlebrow' and popular modernist literature's, as well as to modernism's afterlife in postmodern and contemporary literature. Course Instructor:

LIT 204 - Bodies of Work (6) - The unit explores key questions and debates animating contemporary literary research. Course Instructor:

LIT 301 Contemporary Children's Literature (6) - A study of contemporary literature for children by major American and British writers. Course Instructor:

LIT 302 The Great American Novel (6) - This unit studies some of the major writers in American literature during the twentieth century, and an exploration of the concept of a national literary identity. Course Instructor: Eugene Thorpe

LIT 303 - Mid-Late 19th Century British Literature (6) - This course is an in-depth study of the literature of the British Victorian period. The course will include representative works of fiction, poetry, nonfiction, prose, and drama from throughout the era. The topical focus of the course centers around the theme of appearance versus reality which permeates the culture of the time. Course Instructor: Scott Cavanaugh

LIT 304 Creative Non-Fiction (6) - The unit offers students the opportunity to learn about the practice of one of the key forms of contemporary storytelling. Course Instructor:

LIT 305 Short Fiction (6) - The unit provides a historical and theoretical introduction to the short story, using a wide range of examples from Britain, the United States and Australia as well as a few from Russia, France, Japan, South Africa, South America and Ireland. Course Instructor:

LIT 306 Speculative Fiction (6) - Through a study of the evolution of speculative fiction, also encompassing fantasy and science fiction, in the 20th and 21st centuries, students will learn how these literary genres have emerged. Course Instructor:

LIT 307 Fairy-tale Traditions (6) - The unit focuses upon the historical development of fairy and nursery tales for both adults and children. Course Instructor:

LIT 308 Fantasy (6) - The unit is designed to introduce students to the origins of modern high fantasy via a range of major English texts from the early-Modern to the late-Modern period. Course Instructor:

LIT 309 Horror (6) - The unit is designed to introduce students to the origins of modern horror via a range of major English texts from the early-Modern to the late-Modern period. Course Instructor: Eugene Thorpe

Management

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

MAN 101 - Introduction to Management* (6) - On completion of this unit students should have an understanding of: the nature of managerial work in organisations. Course Instructor:

MAN 102 - Organizational Behavior* (6) - The unit focuses on individual, group, and total organisational human factors influencing the effectiveness of organisations. Course Instructor:

MAN 103 - Strategic Management* (6) - Markets, critical success factors, and strategies employed to gain a competitive advantage. Course Instructor:

MAN 201 - Managerial Communication (6) - This unit is designed to develop students' awareness of communication issues within organisational settings and their own capacity as professionals to communicate effectively. Course Instructor:

MAN 202 - International Business (6) - The international environment including international trade and investment. Course Instructor:

MAN 203 - Human Resource Management (6) - Analysis of the strategic role of HRM in organisations. Course Instructor:

MAN 204 - Leadership in Central America (6) - This unit covers an overall introduction to leadership with an emphasis on the Central American context. Course Instructor:

MAN 205 - Leadership in Europe (6) - This unit covers an overall introduction to leadership with an emphasis on the European context. Course Instructor:

MAN 301 - Organizational Change and Development (6) - This unit introduces students to various concepts of organisational change and development. Course Instructor:

MAN 302 - Social Entrepreneurship (6) - The purpose of this unit is to examine and debate the critical role of social entrepreneurship in the modern business context. Course Instructor:

MAN 303 - Management Information Systems (6) - The components of IT in a management context. Course Instructor:

MAN 304 - International Management (6) - A study of management theory related to varying cultures, the multinational business enterprise and the significance of cross-cultural variables in the business environment. Course Instructor:

MAN 305 - Project Management for Small to Medium Enterprises (6) - The unit content covers the broad perspectives of managerial skills and knowledge required to initiate, implement, and evaluate successful projects. Course Instructor:

MAN 306 - International Business Strategy (6) - This unit will concentrate on the nature and need for international strategy. Course Instructor:



Marketing

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

MAR 101 - Marketing Theory and Practice* (6) - This unit provides students with an introduction to the discipline of marketing. Course Instructor:

MAR 102 - Buyer Behavior* (6) - A study of the factors that influence, explain and help predict consumption behavior for both individuals and organisations. Course Instructor:

MAR 201 - Marketing Insights (6) - This unit bridges the market research process and strategy development by introducing students to industry and competitor analysis, as well as trend and consumer insight techniques, through the synthesis of secondary data. Course Instructor:

MAR 202 - Marketing Law (6) - The legal framework which operates in relation to marketing decisions and practice. Course Instructor:

MAR 203 - Marketing Research Methods (6) - The process of marketing research. Course Instructor:

MAR 204 - Marketing Decision Analysis (6) - Quantitative analysis for marketing, response models, segmentation and targeting, positioning analysis, decision analysis, conjoint analysis; advertising decision models, pricing decisions. Course Instructor:

MAR 301 - Marketing Issues in Packaging Design (6) - The unit reviews the history of packaging, and the dual use of package in today's environment, specifically focusing on both the legal and social requirement of packages, alongside the branding implications. Course Instructor:

MAR 302 - Retail managements Practices (6) - An overview of retailing from a management perspective. Course Instructor:

MAR 303 - Advertising Management and Practice (6) - Students also walk away with in-depth knowledge of the advertising industry and the relationships that exist within. Course Instructor:

MAR 304 - Marketing Channels (6) - The primary aim of this unit is the development and management of distribution channels in order to meet your marketing objectives. Course Instructor:

MAR 305 - Digital Marketing (6) - This subject takes marketing and traditional views of marketing and exposes them to critical analysis in the light of technological change. Course Instructor:

MAR 306 - Global Study Programs in Marketing (6) - This unit is designed to expose students to the thinking of some of the world's leading marketers. Course Instructor:



Medicine (and Related Subjects)

Degree requires completion of at least 66 points of Units including at least 24 points in Levels 3 or 4. Students: Iezika

MED 101 - Intro to Biology* (6) - This course includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Course Instructor:

MED 102 - Intro to Medicine* (6) - This course includes the fundamental principles of medicine. Course Instructor:

MED 103 - Intro to Surgery* (6) - This course includes the fundamental principles of surgery. Course Instructor:

MED 104 - Intro to Medical Research (6) - This course includes the fundamental principles of medical research. Course Instructor:

MED 105 - Medicine II (6) - Further studies in general medicine. Course Instructor:

MED 106 - Medicine III (6) - Further studies in general medicine. Course Instructor:

MED 201 - Advanced Anatomy & Physiology (6) - This course focuses on the structures and functions of the human body. Students will study organs and organ systems, and how body structure relates to function and life processes. It is required for most traditional healthcare and medical fields, as well as for majors in biology, veterinary medicine and other life sciences. Course Instructor:

MED 202 - Medicine IV (6) - Further studies in general medicine. Course Instructor:

MED 203 - Medicine V (6) - Further studies in general medicine. Course Instructor:

MED 204 - Surgery II (6) - Further studies in surgical medicine. Course Instructor:

MED 205 - Surgery III (6) - Further studies in surgical medicine. Course Instructor:

MED 206 - Diagnosis(6) - The processes and concepts of diagnostic medicine. Course Instructor:

MED 301- Immunology (6) - An understanding of the general properties of immune responses; cells and tissues of immune system; lymphocyte activation and specificity; immunity to microbes; immunodeficiency; autoimmune diseases; transplantation. Course Instructor:

MED 302- Physiotherapy and Massage (6) - An understanding of physiotherapy as a healing tool. Course Instructor:

MED 303- Psychology and the Human Body (6) - An understanding of how psychology affects health and healing. Course Instructor: Roxanne Hartley

MED 304 - Medicine VI (6) - Further studies in general medicine. Course Instructor:

MED 305 - Surgery IV (6) - Further studies in surgical medicine. Course Instructor:

MED 306 - Neoplasm (6) - An in-depth study of cancer and related illnesses. Course Instructor:

MED 401 - Regional Study of Human Structure (6) - Comprises two parts, lecture and lab, both of which are required. Lectures in regional anatomy and dissection of the human cadaver; the anatomy of the trunk and limbs through the dissection process, excluding the head and neck. Course Instructor: Dr. Perwinkle Dolittle

MED 402 - Neurology (6) - An in-depth study of the nervous system and the brain. Course Instructor:

MED 403 - General Practice (6) - The art and techniques of being a general practitioner. This also includes expected admin requirements. Course Instructor:

MED 404 - Medicine and the Law (6) - What are your legal responsibilities and rights as a medical practitioner. Course Instructor:

MED 405 - Musculature(6) - An in-depth study of the muscles. Course Instructor:

MED 406 - Bones (6) - An in-depth study of the skeleton. Course Instructor:

MED 407 - Naturopathy and Alternate Medicines (6) - A study of alternative paths to healing. Course Instructor:

MED 408 - Medicines (6) - The history, identification and use of medicines and your responsibilities in handling them. Course Instructor: Roxanne Hartley

MED 409 - Internship* (12) - A full-year internship at the training hospital on campus. Course Instructor:

Music

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

Students: Mikoto

MUS 101 - Music and History* (6) - This unit explores the historical conditions under which music was produced and the purposes it served for composers, performers, patrons and the public. Course Instructor:

MUS 102 - Music and Culture* (6) - This unit explores the ways in which culture shapes the philosophies, techniques, organising principles and concepts of musical performance. Course Instructor:

MUS 103 - Music Participation I (6) - Allows a student to learn, practice and perform on the instrument of their choice. Course Instructor:

MUS 201 – Beginning and Intermediate Instrumental Conducting (6) - Baton technique including analysis of appropriate rehearsal procedures. Course Instructor: Dr. Andrew Bennett

MUS 202 – History of Western Music (6) - Introduction to the critical study of Western music history, including representative composers, works, and genres, as well as significant concepts and issues. Origins of Western Music. Course Instructor: Dr. Andrew Bennett

MUS 203 – History of Eastern Music (6) - Introduction to the critical study of Eastern music history, including representative composers, works, and genres, as well as significant concepts and issues. Origins of Eastern Music. Course Instructor: Dr. Andrew Bennett

MUS 204 – University Symphony Orchestra I (6) - The rehearsal and performance of works for orchestra. The orchestra puts on 4 major concerts a year. Open to music majors and non-majors by audition. Course Instructor: Dr. Andrew Bennett

MUS 205 - Music Participation II (6) - Allows a student to learn, practice and perform on the instrument of their choice. Course Instructor:

MUS 206 - The Music Business (6) - This unit examines fundamental concepts and business practices of the international music industry, focusing on the practical knowledge and transferable skills required to commence and maintain a professional career in the music industry. Course Instructor:

MUS 207 - Recording and Computer Music Production (6) - The unit enables students to record and produce music in live studio and computer-based environments. Course Instructor:

MUS 208 - Song Writing (6) - This unit introduces students to the fundamental concepts of popular songwriting. Course Instructor:

MUS 301 – Advanced Orchestral Conducting (6) - Addresses advanced conducting technique and score study, especially as it applies to the orchestral and operatic repertoire. Course Instructor: Dr. Andrew Bennett

MUS 302 - Baroque Music (6) - Examines the history, forms and styles, and works of composers during this periods. Course Instructor: Dr. Andrew Bennett

MUS 303 - Classical Music (6) - Examines the history, forms and styles, and works of composers during this periods. Course Instructor: Dr. Andrew Bennett

MUS 304 - Romantic Music (6) - Examines the history, forms and styles, and works of composers during this periods. Course Instructor: Dr. Andrew Bennett

MUS 305 - 20th Century Music (6) - Examines the history, forms and styles, and works of composers during this periods. Course Instructor: Dr. Andrew Bennett

MUS 306 - Music Participation III (6) - Allows a student to learn, practice and perform on the instrument of their choice. Course Instructor:

MUS 307 – University Symphony Orchestra II (12) - The rehearsal and performance of works for orchestra. The orchestra puts on 4 major concerts a year. Open to music majors and non-majors by audition. Course Instructor: Dr. Andrew Bennett

MUS 308 – University Musical (12) - The rehearsal and performance of a work written by students. Course Instructor:

Occult Studies

Degree requires completion of at least 36 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

OCC 101 The Occult in Modern Life* (6) - The study of what place, if any, the occult and supernatural ideas of our ancestors still holds in a modern technological world. Course Instructor: Teth

OCC 102 The History of the Occult I* (6) - The history of the occult to the end of the middle ages. Course Instructor: Teth

OCC 103 The History of the Occult II* (6) - The history of the occult since the middles ages. Course Instructor:

OCC 201 Gender Roles in the Occult (6) - Does gender play a role in the propagation of the supernatural? Is it a place of female empowerment or justification for patriarchal roles in society through the ages? Course Instructor:

OCC 202 Occult and Reality (6) - The study of how occult has affected the world where 'evidence' is available. Course Instructor:

OCC 203 Religions and the Occult (6) - What makes an idea a religion instead of the occult? Is there any difference between the two? Course Instructor:

OCC 204 Major Cults (6) - The study of cults through the ages. Course Instructor: Teth

OCC 301 The Occult in Literature (6) - The study of occult literary fiction. Course Instructor:

OCC 302 The Occult in Film (6) - The study of occult in mass media. Course Instructor:

OCC 303 Practical Studies of the Occult (6) - How do you measure and report on the supernatural? Course Instructor:

OCC 304 The Occult in Art (6) - The Study of the occult in art through the ages. Course Instructor:

OCC 305 Case Study (6): Students investigate a local occult occurrence. Course Instructor: Teth

OCC 306 Folklore (6): Students will do an introductory course to Folklore and it's roots. Course Instructor: Teth

OCC 307 Tarot and Divination (6) - A study of divination, especially the Tarot and related forms. Course Instructor: Teth

Palaeontology

Degree requires completion of at least 36 points of Units including at least 12 points in Level 3.

PAL 101 Geology and the Environment* (6) - This unit provides an overview of the tectonic processes that shape Earth's crust, including the principles of sedimentology, palaeontology, and stratigraphy. Course Instructor:

PAL 102 Biology* (6) - Basic biological concepts and principles are covered, including cell structure and function, metabolism, reproduction, genes and inheritance, molecular genetics, and evolution. Course Instructor:

PAL 103 Introductory Palaeontology* (6) - This unit teaches students the fundamental principles of palaeontology and introduces them to the history of life on Earth. Course Instructor:

PAL 201 Field Mapping and Sedimentology (6) - Topics including an introduction to sedimentary rocks, sedimentary environments - past and present, and stratigraphic principles. Course Instructor:

PAL 202 Palaeontology and Stratigraphy (6) - This unit covers a variety of topics in both palaeontology and stratigraphy, including evolution, phylogeny, early life forms, Ediacaran life, the Cambrian explosion, taphonomy (fossil preservation), palaeoecology, palaeobiogeography, extinctions, lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and chronostratigraphy. Course Instructor:

PAL 203 Geological Field Mapping (6) - Unit where the student will further develop the field techniques used in sedimentological, stratigraphic, structural and metamorphic mapping, acquired in prerequisite units. Course Instructor:

PAL 204 Evolution and Biogeography (6) - Students will study fundamental evolutionary processes and patterns of evolution. Course Instructor:

PAL 205 Research Methods in the Sciences (6) - This unit is designed to provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to plan and execute a substantial research-based project and to prepare and present a thesis comprising a literature review and the results of the research project. Course Instructor:

PAL 301 Biological Systematics (6) - Develop understanding and practical skills in species taxonomy and phylogenetic systematics relevant for all botanists, zoologists, evolutionary biologists and teachers of science. Course Instructor:

PAL 302 Principles of Zoology (6) - This unit is about animals and how they interact with their environment. Course Instructor:

PAL 303 Vertebrate Zoology (6) - This unit deals with the origins, evolution, classification, diversity, conservation, behavior, reproductive biology, ecology, and adaptive radiation of extinct and extant vertebrates. Course Instructor:

PAL 304 Invertebrate Zoology (6) - A general survey of the invertebrates covering the taxonomy, anatomy, ecology and evolution of the major free-living and parasitic representatives of this group. Course Instructor:

PAL 305 Science Report (8) - This unit provides students with the opportunity to undertake a mini-research project or literature review in an area of scientific interest upon agreement of professors. Course Instructor:



Philosophy

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3.

PHIL 101 Life, Death and Morality* 6) - This unit is an introduction to moral philosophy. Course Instructor:

PHIL 102 Time, Self and Mind* (6) - This unit is an introduction to metaphysics. Course Instructor:

PHIL 103 Ethics* (6) - This unit covers some central debates in ethical theory. Course Instructor:

PHIL 201 Western Occultism and Mainstream Philosophy (6) - An in depth study of major western occult traditions and their relationship with mainstream western philosophers such as Plato. Course Instructor:

PHIL 202 Political Philosophy (6) - The overarching aim of this unit is to give students a strong foundation in political philosophy. Course Instructor:

PHIL 203 Metaphysics (6) - Metaphysics studies the fundamental nature of reality, and this unit is designed to introduce all philosophy students to the major debates and issues in this broad area of philosophy. Course Instructor:

PHIL 204 After the Death of God (6) - This unit deals with the way in which 'continental' philosophers have sought to deal with the question of the divine in modernity, in the face of the growth of scientific modes of explanation and the decline of religious institutions and belief. Course Instructor:

PHIL 205 Language, Truth and Power (6) - This unit will examine how ways of speaking and communicating create, modify or conform to specific social roles, and how these roles exert pressure on our everyday actions. Course Instructor:

PHIL 301 Symbolic Logic (6) - The unit is intended to provide a survey of modern symbolic logic, concentrating on propositional and predicate logic. Course Instructor:

PHIL 302 The Human Body and the International Marketplace (6) - In this unit we discuss the ethical issues that arise with the international commercialisation of the human body, focusing on the concepts of coercion and exploitation. Course Instructor:

PHIL 303 The Moral Psychology of Evil (6) - This unit investigates the nature of evil, in light of psychological and other factors that enable people to commit acts of great evil. Course Instructor:

PHIL 304 Democratic Theory (6) - This unit considers what the ideal of democracy can mean in contemporary political life, and how (or whether) it can be institutionally achieved. Course Instructor:

PHIL 305 Critical Thinking (6) - This unit is intended to improve students' critical thinking skills. In particular, we focus on the skills involved in argument analysis. Course Instructor:



Political Science

Degree requires completion of at least 36 points of Units including at least 12 points in Level 3.

POL 101 - Foundations of Modern Politics* (6) – The unit introduces foundational ideas, concepts and power structures associated with the modern state. Course instructor:

POL 102 - American Government* (6) – The unit explores the government and politics of the American democratic state. Course instructor:

POL 201 - Parties and Power (6) – This unit concentrates on the political party system. Course instructor:

POL 202 - Political Ideas (6) – The unit surveys a broad spectrum of political thinkers and explores their ideas and the historical contexts in which these ideas emerge. Course instructor:

POL 203 - Leaders, Power and Politics (6) – Leadership is indispensable to politics. Yet it is also a problematic concept within liberal democracies that have traditionally set out to constrain leadership authority. Course instructor:

POL 204 - Identity in Politics (6) – An examination of the use of identity as a bonding mechanism in politics, both by seeking to foster a sense of community among current and desired followers and by designating and creating opposing identities against whom leaders may take a stand. Course instructor:

POL 205 - Public Policy (6) – The unit examines the factors that shape public policy outcomes and the consequences (both deliberate and unintended) that result from particular policy choices. Course instructor:

POL 301 - Local Government (6) – The unit examines the factors that shape local government and the application of political ideology. Course instructor:

POL 302 - Politics and the Media (6) – The unit examines the factors that affect of the media on politics. Course instructor:

POL 303 - Russia and the U.S.: Comparative Politics (6) – The subject examines the domestic politics of Russia and United States. Course instructor:

POL 304 - Political Psychology (6) – This unit offers a broad overview of political psychology, and introduces a new perspective on how to understand the political world around us. Course instructor:

POL 305 - Politics, Violence and Memory (6) – There is a growing imperative for societies, particularly democratic societies, to deal with the violence of the past so that discordant groups can be reconciled and historical injustices repaired. Course instructor:

POL 306 - The Politics of Identity (6) – This Unit will explore political, social and cultural approaches to understanding the politics of identity in the 21st century, the consequences that relationships have for our sense of identity, and how we can understand the variety of human actions that are shaped by these relationships. Course instructor:



Psychology/Psychiatry

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including at least 18 points in Level 3. Psychiatrist degrees will also require at least 18 units of Medical courses.

PSY 101 - Psychology I* (6): Introduction to the discipline of psychology as a behavioral science. Course Instructor:

PSY 102 - Psychology II* (6): An introduction to social, cognitive and abnormal psychology. Course Instructor:

PSY 103 - Biological Psychology (6) - This unit explores how human behavior, both simple and complex, is underpinned by physiological and neural processes. Course Instructor: Roxanne Hartley

PSY 104 - Development Psychology (6) - This unit explores cognitive and behavioral development across the lifespan, including both typical and atypical development. Course Instructor:

PSY 105 - Personality and Social Psychology (6) - This unit explores key concepts in social psychology and personality theory, including the history and philosophy of, and evidence for, competing theories. Course Instructor:

PSY 201 - Applied Psychology: Personal Growth & Development (6) - Course examines the increasing awareness of values, emotions, and other factors that affect an individual's growth. Content includes personal behavior, human relationships, and personal growth in a culturally diverse society. Opportunities will be made available in this class for group experience to examine similarities and differences between self and others in diverse societies. Course Instructor:

PSY 202 - Abnormal Psychology (6) - Course explores the biological, psychosocial, and social/cultural influences on an individual and how these factors produce and maintain various psychological disorders. Content includes therapeutic strategies and preventative measures; assessment of dysfunctional behavior, and categorization of abnormal behavior. Course Instructor:

PSY 203 - Perception and Cognitive Psychology (6) - The first half of this unit covers sensory processes involved in vision, audition and speech perception. The second half encompasses the acquisition, organization, and retrieval of knowledge and aims to cover cognitive psychology more generally. Course Instructor:

PSY 204 - Research Methods in Theory (6) - This principles of research, theory and analysis. Course Instructor:

PSY 205 - Organizational Psychology (6) - The central theme of this unit is applied psychology focused at the individual, group and organizational levels. Course Instructor:

PSY 206 - Health Psychology (6) - This unit will examine the range of psychological factors influencing people's health behavior, their susceptibility and reactions to illness states and responses to medical treatment. Course Instructor: Roxanne Hartley

PSY 207 - Addiction Studies (6) - The unit gives students an overview of issues related to addictive behaviors. Course Instructor:

PSY 301 - Counselling (6) - Counselling theory, interventions and research. Course Instructor:

PSY 302 - Neuropsychology (6) - This unit aims to familiarize students with the assumptions and principles upon which the hypotheses about brain-behavior relationships are based in the discipline of neuropsychology. Course Instructor:

PSY 303 - Sleep and Circadian Rhythms (6) - This unit will give students an understanding of the neurobiological processes that control sleep and circadian rhythms, as well as the consequences of their dysfunction. Course Instructor:

PSY 304 - Metaphor and Meaning (6) - The study of dreams and metaphor in human psychology. Course Instructor:

PSY 305 - Psychological Testing and Ethics (6) - This unit teaches the principles and processes of test development and concepts of test reliability and validity. Course Instructor:

PSY 306 - Medicine and Psychology (6) - Learning about medication and its application to psychological treatment. Course Instructor: Roxanne Hartley

PSY 307 - Case Study (8) - Students use their knowledge to diagnose and treat patients with possible psychological issues. Course Instructor:



Religious Studies

Degree requires completion of at least 36 points of Units.

REL 101 Religions and the Modern World* (6) - This unit is a general introduction to the study of religions, spirituality, and belief and non-belief, in the contemporary world. Course Instructor: John Thorpe

REL 102 World Religions* (6) - This unit introduces students to the history, core teachings and central practices of many of the world's religions. Course Instructor: John Thorpe

REL 103 Religion in America (6) - This unit examines the current state of religion and spirituality in America, compares this with the rest of the world, and offers a sociological interpretation of these developments. Course Instructor:

REL 201 Islam (6) - This unit examines the evolution and influence of Islam as a religion and civilization, with particular emphasis on the principles underpinning Islamic law and theology and Islamic civilization in its classic phase. Course Instructor:

REL 202 Christianity(6) - This unit examines the evolution and influence of Christianity as a religion and civilization, with particular emphasis on the principles underpinning Christian law and theology and Christian civilization in its classic phase. Course Instructor: John Thorpe

REL 203 Ancient Religions (6) - The unit introduces students to key themes for understanding the nature, the forms and the organizational structure of religion in ancient Mediterranean cultures, with particular reference to the ancient near east. Course Instructor:

REL 204 Sources of Religious Violence (6) - This unit looks at a range of texts from Eastern religions and from Judaism, Christianity and Islam, in both past and present manifestations, to consider how their interpreters have engaged with the question of legitimizing violence and war against minorities or other groups in society and how such imagery may shape their understanding of an ideal world. Course Instructor: John Thorpe

REL 301 Imagining God (6) - The unit explores the ways God is imagined in a variety of religious and mystical traditions, focusing on Christian mysticism (early and medieval), classical Sufism (Islam), mystical currents within Judaism (rabbinic and Kabbalistic), as well as the transformations of mysticism in the post-enlightenment and secular world. It will consider how mystical literature and teaching relates to religious practice, its social/political function within any religion, and the extent to which it may challenge religious authority, while also drawing its discourse from a religious tradition. Course Instructor:

REL 302 Buddhism (6) - This unit examines the evolution and influence of Buddhism as a religion and civilization, with particular emphasis on the principles underpinning Buddhist law and theology and Buddhist civilization in its classic phase. Course Instructor:

REL 303 Hinduism (6) - This unit examines the evolution and influence of Hinduism as a religion and civilization, with particular emphasis on the principles underpinning Hindu law and theology and Hindu civilization in its classic phase. Course Instructor:

REL 304 Thinking About Religion (6) - This unit considers different ways of thinking about religion and religious belief, both phenomenological (historical, social scientific, etc.) and philosophical. Course Instructor:

Science (Biochemistry)

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least one Level 3.

SBC 101 - Biology* (6) - A study of animal and plant biology and diversity from genes to whole organisms. Course Instructor:

SBC 102 - Chemistry* (6) - The curriculum focuses on general and physical chemistry principles which in turn complements the chemistry topics discussed in the subsequent units. Course Instructor:

SBC 103 - Biology II* (6) - Advanced study of animal and plant biology and diversity from genes to whole organisms. Course Instructor:

SBC 104 - Chemistry II* (6) - The curriculum focuses on advanced chemistry principles. Course Instructor:

SBC 201 - Cellular Biomolecules (6) - This unit focuses on the action of major classes of biomolecules in biologically and medically relevant systems. Course Instructor:

SBC 202 - Metabolic Basis of Human Diseases (6) - A general outline of cellular metabolism is provided. Course Instructor:

SBC 203 - The Cell (6) - In this unit we will explore the construction, components and maintenance of the cell. Course Instructor:

SBC 204 - Protein Biology* (6) - The course will give students an advanced understanding of protein structure-function in the context of human disease. Course Instructor:

SBC 301 - Molecular Microbiology (6) - This unit concentrates on specific aspects of bacterial molecular biology. Course Instructor:

SBC 302 - Molecular Virology (6) - The unit will cover molecular aspects of virus replication and introduce the students to the mechanisms used by viruses in causing disease in infected hosts. Course Instructor:

SBC 303 - Medical and Forensic Genetics (6) - The study of genetics and its applications to medicine and forensic biology including genetic disorders, genetic screening and DNA profiling. Course Instructor:

SBC 304 - Genomics (6) - Recent technological advances in DNA analysis now allow the rapid and relatively cheap sequencing of entire genomes of individual organisms. Course Instructor:

SBC 305 - Advanced Cell Work (6) - Advanced research of the cell and its myriad facets. Course Instructor:

SBC 306 - Practical Biochemistry (8) - This unit provides the opportunity for high achieving students to work with an academic supervisor and complete a research project in Biochemistry. Course Instructor:



Science (Biotechnology)

Degree requires completion of at least 42 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least one Level 3.

SBT 101 - Biology* (6) - A study of animal and plant biology and diversity from genes to whole organisms. Course Instructor:

SBT 102 - Foundations of Genetics* (6) - The principles, concepts, organisms and techniques of genetics are covered in this unit. Course Instructor:

SBT 103 - Laboratory and Workplace Management* (6) - This unit is designed to introduce intending scientists to the principles of laboratory and workplace management and their obligations as experts and supervisors. Course Instructor:

SBT 201 - Advanced Biology (6) - Deeper studies in human biology. Course Instructor:

SBT 202 - Recombinant DNA Technology (6) - This unit will provide the opportunity to gain an understanding of the nature and use of the "tools of the trade" applied routinely by molecular biologists. Course Instructor:

SBT 203 - Medical and Forensic Genetics (6) - The unit will focus on current techniques in DNA testing both in medical diagnosis and forensic biology. Course Instructor:

SBT 204 - Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (6) - This unit focuses on recombinant DNA methodology and genomics, which underpin commercial developments in the rapidly expanding biotechnology industry. Course Instructor:

SBT 301 - Fundamentals of Microbiology (6) - The overall theme of this unit is to introduce students to microorganisms. Course Instructor:

SBT 302 - Genomics and its Applications (6) - This unit will explore the use of whole-genome techniques to examine gene regulation, identify the genes controlling both simple and complex traits, determine how individuals and populations adapt to selective pressure and piece together the evolutionary changes that have given rise to complex multicellular life. Course Instructor:

SBT 303 - Biochemistry(6) - The unit begins with an introduction to the cellular environment, considering the interactions that stabilize biological macromolecules and the maintenance of constant pH within cells and organisms. Course Instructor:

SBT 304 - Medical Microbiology (6) - This unit focuses on infectious diseases of the organ systems, summarizing the aetiology, pathogenesis and laboratory identification of important pathogens. Course Instructor:

SBT 305 - Plant Biotechnology (6) - This unit introduces the role of plant breeding and its significance in plant biotechnology, plant genomes and organization, the regulation of gene expression, plant cell and tissue culture methodologies, gene transformation techniques, the application of transgenic technology for crop improvement (including the production of transgenic plants resistant to abiotic and biotic stresses and crops with prolonged shelf life and enhanced nutritional value) and the use of transgenic plants as bioreactors for the production of novel proteins in medicine and industry. Course Instructor:

SBT 306 - Science in Action Research Project (8) - An individual research project in a discipline relating to a major area of study, conducted under supervision. Includes critical literature review, experimental design and data analysis, seminar attendance. Course Instructor:



Science (Chemistry)

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least one Level 3.

SCH 101 - Chemistry I* (6) - The curriculum focuses on general and physical chemistry principles which in turn complements the synthetic chemistry topics discussed in the subsequent units. Course Instructor:

SCH 102 - Chemistry II* (6) - Students will exploit their understanding of general and physical chemistry discussed in SCH101 to explore the behavior of chemicals in a number of interesting case studies incorporating a range of significant biological and synthetic molecules such as carbohydrates, proteins and polymers and pharmaceutically important drugs. Course Instructor:

SCH 103 - Chemistry Advanced* (6) - On completion of this unit, students will have gained an understanding of how atoms and molecules interact with each other and how this affects their bonding, reactivity, 3D structure and physical properties. Course Instructor:

SCH 201 - Inorganic and Organic Chemistry (6) - Basic principles and key aspects of molecular design, synthesis, structure and reactivity of carbon based molecules, organo-transition metal chemistry and metal complexes with examples taken from important biological, industrial and environmental processes. Course Instructor:

SCH 202 - Spectroscopy and Analytical Chemistry (6) - This unit covers the theory and instrumentation behind common physical and analytical instrumental techniques such as infra-red, Raman, UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence and atomic spectroscopies, mass spectrometry, chromatography and electroanalytical chemistry. Course Instructor:

SCH 203 - Biological Chemistry (6) - In this unit students will be able to apply their knowledge by examining chemical processes in a biological context. Course Instructor:

SCH 204 - Environmental Chemistry - Water (6) - A fundamental understanding of the principles underlying aquatic chemistry and their application in the study of aquatic processes. Course Instructor:

SCH 205 - Materials Chemistry (6) - The unit describes the structure, properties and synthesis of biomaterials, macromolecules, and 'smart' inorganic materials, which are designed to carry out a range of sensing or active functions. Course Instructor:

SCH 206 - Medicinal Chemistry (6) - This unit focuses on several major classes of biologically and clinically important therapeutic agents. Course Instructor:

SCH 301 - Environmental Chemistry (6) - The three major components of the environment, air, soil and water, are considered. Course Instructor:

SCH 302 - Sustainable Chemistry (6) - The development of chemical tools that allow realisation of the concept of a sustainable future. Course Instructor:

SCH 303 - Food Chemistry (6) - A detailed account of the chemistry of food substances will be provided. Course Instructor:

SCH 304 - Advanced Organic and Inorganic Chemistry (6) - A description of the advanced tools and methodologies that are used in the determination of reaction mechanisms will be provided. Course Instructor:

SCH 305 - Advanced Analytical Chemistry (6) - Advances in analytical science will involve the development and exploitation of advanced mass spectrometric, molecular spectroscopic and separation techniques. Course Instructor:

SCH 306 - Chemistry Research Project (8) - This course allows students to devote themselves to a substantial laboratory project as part of their final year of study in Chemistry. Course Instructor:



Science (Mathematics)

Degree requires completion of at least 36 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least one Level 3.

SMT 101 - Analysis of Change* (6) - Properties of real and complex numbers; algebraic functions and common transcendental functions. Course Instructor:

SMT 102 - Techniques for Modeling* (6) - Solution of systems of linear equations. Course Instructor:

SMT 201 - Multivariable Calculus (6) - Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, extreme values, Lagrange multipliers. Course Instructor:

SMT 202 - Statistical Methods for Science (6) - Descriptive statistics, scatter plots, correlation, line of best fit. Course Instructor:

SMT 203 - Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science (6) - This unit introduces fundamental discrete mathematics topics including combinatorics, sets, relations and functions. Course Instructor:

SMT 204 - Functions and Their Applications (6) - Functions, domain and range, function representation. Course Instructor:

SMT 301 - Advanced Techniques for Modeling(6) - Advanced solution of systems of linear equations. Course Instructor:

SMT 302 - Continuous Mathematics for Computer Science (6) - The unit covers linear algebra (vectors, equations of lines and planes, solutions of simultaneous equations, determinates, Gauss elimination, Gauss-Jordan method). Course Instructor:

SMT 303 - Linear Algebra With Applications (6) - Applications to coding, economics, networks, graph theory, geometry, dynamical systems, Markov chains, differential equations. Course Instructor:

SMT 304 - Partial Differentiation Equations (6) - PDEs; first-order PDEs and characteristics, the advection equation. Course Instructor:

SMT 305 - Mathematics of Uncertainty (6) - Introduction to probability - a mathematical treatment. Course Instructor:

SMT 306 - Real Analysis (6) - Real analysis with a special focus on sequences of real numbers and functions. Course Instructor:

SMT 307 - Differential Geometry (6) - This unit will explore the metric structure of curves and surfaces, primarily in 3-dimensional Euclidean space. Course Instructor:

SMT 308 - Fluid Dynamics (6) - The continuum hypothesis; notion of a fluid particle; pathlines and streamlines. Eulerian and Lagrangian frameworks; the material derivative. Course Instructor:



Science (Physics)

Degree requires completion of at least 36 points of Units including all Level 1 and at least one Level 3.

SPH 101 - Classical Physics and Reality* (6) - In this unit you will build on your knowledge of classical (non-quantum) physics related to concepts of motion, forces, momentum and energy. Course Instructor:

SPH 102 - Foundation Physics* (6) - The unit introduces fundamental principles of physics of importance to engineering, and their applications. Course Instructor:

SPH 103 - Physics for the Living World* (6) - Principles of force and movement applied to skeletal structures, human movement and sport, centrifugation, oscillations, effects on living systems. Course Instructor:

SPH 201 - Applied Physics (6) - Viable lessons in the practical and theoretical applications of physics, both as known and developing concepts. This course details elements of history as it is applied to physics in action and plots out potential manners it can be turned into functional and viable aspects of scientific and commercial development. Course Instructor:

SPH 202 - Field and Quantum Physics (6) - This unit forms part of main-stream physics and provides foundations in rotational dynamics, the gravitational field, electrostatics, magnetism and quantum physics. Course Instructor: Yossarian

SPH 203 - Quantum Mechanics and Thermal Physics (6) - Quantum physics is at the core of physics and this unit provides a basis for understanding key quantum concepts, applications and associated phenomena. Course Instructor: Yossarian

SPH 204 - Electromagnetism and Optics (6) - Electromagnetism and optics fundamentally underpin such modern communication technologies as radio, cellular phones, GPS, Wi-Fi, laser and optical fibres. Course Instructor:

SPH 205 - Atomic and Nuclear Physics (6) - The atomic physics sub-unit explores the development of our current understanding of the electronic properties of atoms. Course Instructor:

SPH 301 - Foundations of Contemporary Physics (6) - This unit provides the foundation for a theoretical and/or experimental major in physics. Course Instructor: Yossarian

SPH 302 - Photon Physics (6) - Photonics: lasers and coherent light, modulation devices, optical waveguides, interference and holography, fiber optic communications, transmission and coupling to hardware and software devices, applications. Course Instructor:

SPH 303 - Theoretical Physics (6) - This unit will provide students with a better basis for carrying out study and research in theoretical physics. Course Instructor:

SPH 304 - Condensed Matter Physics (6) - Condensed Matter Physics: the concept of reciprocal space, the basic theory for the behavior of electrons and phonons in solid crystalline materials, band theory, phonons, electronic properties of semiconductors, superconductivity, superfluidity, low dimensional materials, quasi-periodic and amorphous solids. Course Instructor:

SPH 305 - Particle Physics (6) - Elementary Particles: experimental methods used in contemporary particle physics and the fundamental properties that classify leptons, hadrons and quarks, the role of conservation laws and symmetry in the production of and interactions between elementary particles, quantum chromo-dynamics, strong and weak interactions, the cosmological implications. Course Instructor:

Sociology

Degree requires completion of at least 48 points of Units including least 12 points in Level 3.

SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology* (6) - In this subject students will begin the process of learning about the concepts and approaches used by sociologists to analyze and gain an understanding of the social world. Course Instructor:

SOC 102 - The Individual and Society* (6) - Introduces students to important areas of sociological research and theoretical endeavor. Course Instructor:

SOC 103 - Gender, Theory and Society (6) - This unit introduces a range of exciting contemporary feminist theories. Course Instructor:

SOC 104 - Social Research Methods (6) - Doing social science research requires us to think conceptually, to systematically plan how we might obtain valid information relevant to the research questions we are asking, and to analyze information. Course Instructor:

SOC 201 - Population and Society (6) - The unit examines American population issues and their social dimensions. Course Instructor:

SOC 202 - Contemporary Issues in Social Science Research (6) - In this unit, students will identify an issue of interest to them drawn from their undergraduate studies in Behavioral studies, Sociology and/or Gender Studies. Course Instructor:

SOC 203 - Youth, Culture and Social Change (6) - This unit explores the social dynamics of youth experience in contemporary society. Course Instructor:

SOC 204 - Sex and the Media (6) - Sex and the media will examine contemporary media and the implications these have for gender, identity, relationships, communities and social policy. Course Instructor:

SOC 205 - Health, Culture and Society (6) - The unit examines the sociological aspects of health. Course Instructor:

SOC 206 - Cultural Diversity and Identity (6) - The main concepts and theoretical approaches in the study of cultural diversity, ethnicity and migration. Course Instructor:

SOC 301 - Families, Relationships and Society (6) - This unit focuses on intimate relationships and the complexities of contemporary family life. Course Instructor:

SOC 302 - Critical Social Psychology (6) - This unit addresses the social aspects of individual experience. Course Instructor:

SOC 303 - Men, Masculinity and Society (6) - This unit explores recent sociological analyses of men and masculinity. Course Instructor:

SOC 304 - Environment and Society (6) - In this unit we explore the critical problem of global environmental change as a social process. Course Instructor:

SOC 305 - Global Consumption (6) - This unit explores the processes of global consumption with a focus on the interrelationships between sex, race, and contemporary western consumer practices. Course Instructor:

SOC 306 - Global Childhood (6) - This The unit introduces key concepts related to children and childhood from fields including sociology, anthropology, critical legal studies, postcolonial and development studies, and rights literature. Course Instructor:



Sports Management

Degree requires completion of at least 44 points including all eight * units and at least 12 points in Level 3.

Students: Jack

SM101 - Sport Finance* (4) - This unit expands upon basic accounting and finance concepts with emphasis on the application of those concepts to a range of problems of relevance to the sport industry. Course Instructor:

SM102 - Sports Law* (4) - Students will examine the role of law and regulation in the context of sport and policy. Course Instructor:

SM103 - Sport Economics* (4) - This unit will cover: the demand, supply and pricing in the sport industry, sports revenues; whether clubs are profit-maximisers or win-maximisers, competitive imbalance in sport such as player drafts, salary caps and revenue sharing, the sport industry, including government subsidies, private delivery of sport and sport participation, the economic impact of sports, stadium financing; labour markets and sport, regulation of sports, international issues, future directions of the sport industry. Course Instructor:

SM104 - Sport, Culture and Industry* (4) - Students examine sport and its significance in contemporary culture. Course Instructor:

SM201 - Introduction to Management* (4) - Students gain an understanding of: the nature of managerial work in organisations. Course Instructor:

SM202 - Business Stategy* (4) - Students learn how business environments including markets, critical success factors, and strategies employed to gain a competitive advantage. Course Instructor:

SM203 - Consumer Psychology* (4) - This unit draws upon the concepts and theories developed in the social sciences to provide students with an introduction to the complex area of consumer psychology and decision-making. Course Instructor:

SM204 - Sports Marketing and Sponsorship* (4) - The unit considers the role of sport in contemporary society and the interconnectedness of sport and business, particularly marketing. Course Instructor:

SM301 - Accounting for Managers (6) - This unit introduces basic accounting concepts to non-accountants. Course Instructor:

SM302 - Business Law (6) - Students will examine the role of commercial law in shaping business structures, transactions and conduct. Course Instructor:

SM303 - Microeconomics (6) - Economics in a business degree. Course Instructor:

SM304 - Marketing Theory and Practice (6) - Introduction to marketing activities undertaken by a wide range of organisations (business, government, profit, non profit. Course Instructor:

SM305 - Practical Management (12) - Students are required to successfully manage and promote one of the University sporting teams. Course Instructor:

Fraternities and Sororities

Sigma Sigma Chi -
Sanctioned social/academic fraternity
Pi Alpha Kappa -
The local chapter of a large Sorority known for its charity work and such. Secretly the cover for a college based Hunter organization of students and alumni defending the campuses from monsters.
Zeta Pi -
Social sorority

Radio Station

89.3 SJU "The Other Side Of Radio" - Local radio station ran at the University that offers a wide range of alternative music slots with genres from acid jazz to oldies, alternative folk to EDM. Along with local news, local politics, University event reminders, farmers report, sports, local business commercials and more. Run by students and faculty of Saint John's University.
Just addcom rad=SJU Radio to "listen" (click on YouTube links that pop up) with occasional commercials/news run by PCs or Staff.

Radio Station Manager:
Professor Johnny 'The Love Doctor' Guthrie

SJURadio.jpg


Current DJs:
Midnight
  • Midnight Caller - Late night/early morning talk show format where callers can tell of their encounters with the strange and terrifying.
Sarah, Shyla
  • The Sarah and Shyla Show (SASS) - What's happening at St. John's and in the world. Emphasis on a youth approach - listen to the latest music while hearing about the latest gossip.
Sophia


Sports and Clubs

SJU Shark.png


Football (Division III) (St. John's Hammerheads) -

Quarterback:

Wide Receivers/Safeties:

Running Backs/Linebackers: Camron

Cheerleaders - St. John's Angels - Chantal


Gymnastics -


Lacrosse (Division 1) (St. John's Razorteeth) -


Soccer (Men's Division II) (St. John's Barracudas) - Jack


Soccer (Women's Division III) (St. John's Starfish) -

Iezika

Paige

Swimming and Diving (Men's Division I) -


Swimming and Diving (Women's Division I) -


Track and Field -


Water Polo (Men's Division 1) (St. John's Mermen) -


Water Polo (Women's Division 2) (St. John's Mermaids) -


Social and Student Clubs and Societies

Knights of St. John - Historical European Martial Arts club (contact Professor Ambroise Dubois)




Student Services:

St John's University Intern Clinic - As a part of student tuition, students are afforded free healthcare by way of the campus clinic. These services are also offered to low-income civilians at a minor fee. Most of the staff are final year interns from both the University and other medical schools in the state.

Buildings and Departments:

Chelsea Dunlin Library

Delaney Residence Hall

Maddy's Waffle House

University Status

  • All SJU employees are subject to criminal background checks and are expected to comport themselves in a respectful manner at all times.
  • Any public behaviour by school employees and students that threatens the good reputation of the school will result in immediate termination and/or expulsion.
  • All requests for Status (University) should be submitted via +req/city. Students should have Status 1.
  • Characters with Status (Criminal Underworld) 2+ and/or a criminal record must have some extraordinary explanation (eg. Merit: New Identity 2) in order to obtain Status (University) higher than 1.

Status 1 - Undergraduate Student

Prerequisites: Academics 2
+ mention of attendance in character background or RP log

Status 2 - Teaching Assistant / Grad Student / University Administrator / Other Staff

Prerequisites:
Grad Student stream: Academics 2
Teaching stream: Academics 2 OR Science 2
Bureaucrat stream: Politics 2 + Persuasion 2
Laborer stream: Crafts 2 + Athletics 2
+ mention of working at the university in character background or RP log

Status 3 - Professor / University Senior Administrator

Prerequisites:
Teaching stream: Academics 3 OR Science 3
Bureaucrat stream: Politics 3 + Persuasion 3
+ mention of working at the university in character background or RP log
+ Professors should have at least one course description listed on the University wiki

Status 4 - Tenured Professor / University Vice President / Board Members

Teaching stream: Academics 4 OR Science 4
Bureaucrat stream: Politics 4 + Persuasion 4
+ In order to reach Status 4, one must have already spent time RPing at Status 3. Please submit a +req/city with four logged scenes with other university-faction characters on school grounds. Once your +req is received, this will initiate a vote of all University Faction members with Status 1 or higher, weighted by Status.

Status 5 - University President

This is an NPC position

University Students, Faculty and Alumni

To appear on this list add the following categories to your wiki:

Student - University, Student

Teaching Staff - University, Teacher

Non-Teaching Staff - University, Admin

Alumni - Alumni (no need to add the University category)

Students Teaching Staff Non-Teaching Staff

none

Alumni

Logs

Logs (Please link to: St. John's University )
  • (2015.08.05)
High School - The Contact
  • (2015.08.06)
High School - The Witness
  • (2015.08.07)
The Lives of the Warrior Poets
  • (2015.08.21)
Zeta Pi Summer Bash
  • (2015.08.28)
High School - The Party
  • (2015.08.28)
High School - Stumbling In
  • (2015.10.10)
Indian Burial Ground School Trip
  • (2015.10.14)
The Nest
  • (2015.10.24)
We Go In At Night
  • (2015.11.05)
The Nest - Planning
  • (2015.11.05)
The Nest - The Call
  • (2015.11.20)
High School - Finding the Egg
  • (2015.12.29)
Deadites - The Campus
  • (2016.01.08)
The Nest - Chatting with Nolberto
  • (2016.01.16)
The Nest - The Library
  • (2016.01.23)
Deadites - The Campus II
  • (2016.02.03)
Destination Zero
  • (2016.02.19)
The Nest - Under the Library
  • (2016.03.12)
The Nest - Library Returns
  • (2016.03.14)
Ghost Video 837
  • (2016.03.20)
A Case of Sewercide
  • (2016.03.22)
Threads and Medicine
  • (2016.04.21)
Old Books Between Classes
  • (2016.05.12)
Chance Meeting The Day After
  • (2016.06.12)
A Chance Meeting
  • (2016.06.22)
Out of the Shadows - Chapter One - You Need a Library Card for That
  • (2016.07.01)
Ghost on Sorority Row
  • (2016.07.14)
The Storeroom - Sarcophagus of Death
  • (2016.07.14)
Meeting Professor Yossarian
  • (2016.07.21)
Ghost on Sorority Row - Dorthy Investigates!
  • (2016.07.30)
SASS - Episode One
  • (2016.08.06)
SASS - Episode Two
  • (2016.08.13)
SASS - Episode Three
  • (2016.08.21)
SASS - Episode Four
  • (2016.08.28)
SASS - Episode Five
  • (2016.09.03)
SASS - Episode Six
  • (2016.09.10)
University Open Day 2016
  • (2016.09.24)
SASS - Episode Eight
  • (2016.10.08)
SASS - Episode Nine
  • (2016.10.22)
SASS - Episode Ten
  • (2016.10.29)
SASS - Episode Eleven
  • (2016.10.29)
Walking new Paths
  • (2016.11.06)
Rainbow Headed Hipsters Burning
  • (2016.11.12)
SASS - Episode Twelve
  • (2016.11.19)
SASS - Episode Thirteen
  • (2016.12.09)
Student Counselling
  • (2016.12.17)
SASS - Episode Fourteen
  • (2017.01.07)
SASS - Episode Fifteen
  • (2017.01.22)
The Child - Campus Sniper
  • (2017.01.31)
Ghost on Sorority Row - The Scouring
  • (2017.02.01)
Ghost on Sorority Row - Epilogue
  • (2017.02.04)
SASS - Episode Sixteen
  • (2017.02.22)
Midnight Caller, 22 Feb 2017
  • (2017.03.04)
SASS - Episode Seventeen
  • (2017.03.18)
Midnight Visitor
  • (2017.03.18)
SASS - Episode Eighteen
  • (2017.03.24)
Making Movies
  • (2017.03.25)
SASS - Episode Nineteen
  • (2017.04.17)
A New Scholarship?
  • (2017.04.28)
The First Cut
  • (2017.04.29)
SASS - Episode Twenty
  • (2017.04.30)
Congratulations, Elsa
  • (2017.05.06)
SASS - Episode Twenty-one
  • (2017.05.20)
SASS - Episode Twenty-Two
  • (2017.06.17)
A Geek Education
  • (2017.07.29)
SASS - Episode Twenty-Five
  • (2017.08.26)
University Open Day Fall 2017
  • (2017.09.02)
This One Time, At Ren Faire
  • (2017.09.02)
Midnight Appraisal